Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/9781
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dc.contributor.authorTan, Han Khimen
dc.contributor.authorUchino, Shigehikoen
dc.contributor.authorBellomo, Rinaldoen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-15T22:59:57Z
dc.date.available2015-05-15T22:59:57Z
dc.date.issued2004-03-01en
dc.identifier.citationRenal Failure; 26(2): 149-53en
dc.identifier.govdoc15287198en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/9781en
dc.description.abstractTo compare the effect of lactate vs. bicarbonate-buffered replacement fluids on electrolyte mass balance during isovolemic continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH).Randomized controlled study with double cross over.Intensive care unit of a tertiary university hospital.Eight patients with acute renal failure (ARF).Isovolemic CVVH (2L/hr of replacement fluid) was performed in random order with either bicarbonate or lactate-buffered replacement fluid delivered pre-filter.Sodium, potassium, chloride, magnesium, and phosphate, were measured in each sample. There was a mass gain of sodium, which was similar under both conditions (bicarbonate: 23.3+/-4.9 mmol/hr, lactate: 22.7+/-3.5 mmol/hr). Mass chloride gains occurred with bicarbonate-buffered replacement fluid only (12.8+/-5.3 mmol/hr), while there was an overall net loss of chloride with lactate fluids (-2.5+/-5.2 mmol/hr), resulting in a significant difference in chloride mass balance (p<0.0001). Magnesium mass balance was negative with bicarbonate buffer only (-0.6+/-0.2 mmol/hr) and also differed significantly from that obtained with lactate fluids (-0.1+/-0.2 mmol/hr, p<0.0001). Phosphate losses (bicarbonate: -1.7+/-0.7 mmol/hr, lactate: -1.7+/-0.5 mmol/hr) were equivalent with both buffers. Potassium mass balance was neutral.Mass balance during isovolemic CVVH is significantly affected by the type of replacement fluid administered prefilter. Isovolemic CVVH is not isonatremic and the use of bicarbonate-buffered fluid results in a significant accumulation of chloride and a loss of magnesium.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAcute Kidney Injury.diagnosis.mortality.therapyen
dc.subject.otherAdulten
dc.subject.otherAgeden
dc.subject.otherBicarbonates.therapeutic useen
dc.subject.otherBuffersen
dc.subject.otherCross-Over Studiesen
dc.subject.otherEmergency Service, Hospitalen
dc.subject.otherFemaleen
dc.subject.otherFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.otherHemodialysis Solutionsen
dc.subject.otherHemofiltration.methodsen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherMaleen
dc.subject.otherMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.otherProbabilityen
dc.subject.otherRisk Assessmenten
dc.subject.otherSodium Lactate.therapeutic useen
dc.subject.otherStatistics, Nonparametricen
dc.subject.otherSurvival Rateen
dc.subject.otherTreatment Outcomeen
dc.subject.otherWater-Electrolyte Balance.physiologyen
dc.titleElectrolyte mass balance during CVVH: lactate vs. bicarbonate-buffered replacement fluids.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleRenal failureen
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Intensive Care and Surgery, Austin Hospital, Melbourne, Australiaen
dc.description.pages149-53en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15287198en
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
crisitem.author.deptIntensive Care-
crisitem.author.deptData Analytics Research and Evaluation (DARE) Centre-
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