Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/9740
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dc.contributor.authorJerums, Georgeen
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Terri Jen
dc.contributor.authorTsalamandris, Conen
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Mark Een
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-15T22:56:39Z
dc.date.available2015-05-15T22:56:39Z
dc.date.issued1992-04-01en
dc.identifier.citationKidney International; 41(4): 904-11en
dc.identifier.govdoc1513112en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/9740en
dc.description.abstractSmall increases in blood pressure are a feature of incipient diabetic nephropathy, and mean blood pressure often correlates with the degree of albuminuria in such patients. Antihypertensive therapy with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (CEI) or calcium channel blockers (CCB) has been assessed in several studies to determine if either form of treatment modifies incipient diabetic nephropathy and its evolution to established nephropathy. The acute renal hemodynamic effects of CEI differ from those of CCB under certain circumstances. In incipient diabetic nephropathy, therapy with CEI but not CCB tends to reduce filtration fraction, especially in hyperfiltering patients. In hypertensive patients with incipient diabetic nephropathy, both treatments result in a decrease in albuminuria and the responses are mainly dependent on the lowering of systemic blood pressure. In normotensive patients with incipient diabetic nephropathy, a lowering of mean blood pressure with CEI or CCB is not found consistently while effects on albuminuria are difficult to interpret. Short- and long-term therapy with CEI lowers or stabilizes albuminuria. Short-term administration of CCB has at times been associated with increases in albuminuria, but a comparison of CEI and CCB over 12 months in the Melbourne Diabetic Nephropathy Study (MDNS) has shown that both drugs stabilize albuminuria with no significant differences in their effects. Serial analysis of urinary sodium excretion in the MDNS shows that the hypotensive response to CEI in incipient nephropathy is highly dependent on sodium intake, and that sodium intake may modulate albuminuria during both CEI and CCB therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAngiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors.therapeutic useen
dc.subject.otherAnimalsen
dc.subject.otherAntihypertensive Agents.therapeutic useen
dc.subject.otherBlood Pressureen
dc.subject.otherCalcium Channel Blockers.therapeutic useen
dc.subject.otherDiabetic Nephropathies.diagnosis.drug therapyen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherReference Valuesen
dc.subject.otherSodium.metabolismen
dc.subject.otherTime Factorsen
dc.titleAngiotensin converting enzyme inhibition and calcium channel blockade in incipient diabetic nephropathy. The Melbourne Diabetic Nephropathy Study Group.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleKidney Internationalen
dc.identifier.affiliationEndocrine Unit, Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australiaen
dc.description.pages904-11en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1513112en
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.languageiso639-1en-
crisitem.author.deptEndocrinology-
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