Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/9364
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dc.contributor.authorOlver, James Sen
dc.contributor.authorBurrows, Graham Den
dc.contributor.authorNorman, Trevor Ren
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-15T22:26:01Z
dc.date.available2015-05-15T22:26:01Z
dc.date.issued2001en
dc.identifier.citationCns Drugs; 15(12): 941-54en
dc.identifier.govdoc11735614en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/9364en
dc.description.abstractThird-generation antidepressants are a group of antidepressant agents of variable action, not confined to serotonin reuptake inhibition. These agents include venlafaxine, reboxetine, nefazodone and mirtazapine. Claims have been made for these agents in terms of improved efficacy, faster speed of onset of effect and greater safety in the treatment of depression compared with previous medications, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). This article reviews the evidence for these improvements. Thirty active comparator studies were reviewed involving the third-generation antidepressant agents. While there were isolated reports of improvements over comparator agents for venlafaxine, reboxetine and mirtazepine, there were no convincing differences between third-generation agents and comparators in terms of overall efficacy, relapse prevention and speed of onset. The third-generation antidepressants were, however, of equivalent safety to SSRIs and maintained improvements in safety over first-generation agents.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAntidepressive Agents.adverse effects.pharmacokinetics.therapeutic useen
dc.subject.otherClinical Trials as Topicen
dc.subject.otherDepressive Disorder.drug therapy.prevention & controlen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherSecondary Preventionen
dc.subject.otherSerotonin Uptake Inhibitors.adverse effects.therapeutic useen
dc.titleThird-generation antidepressants: do they offer advantages over the SSRIs?en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleCNS drugsen
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Austin & Repatriation Medical Centre, West Heidelberg, Victoria, Australiaen
dc.description.pages941-54en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11735614en
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
crisitem.author.deptPsychiatry (University of Melbourne)-
crisitem.author.deptPsychiatry (University of Melbourne)-
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