Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/9245
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dc.contributor.authorOsicka, Tanya Men
dc.contributor.authorHoulihan, Christine Aen
dc.contributor.authorChan, J Gordonen
dc.contributor.authorJerums, Georgeen
dc.contributor.authorComper, Wayne Den
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-15T22:15:50Z
dc.date.available2015-05-15T22:15:50Z
dc.date.issued2000-09-01en
dc.identifier.citationDiabetes; 49(9): 1579-84en
dc.identifier.govdoc10969843en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/9245en
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies by our group have shown that albumin is metabolized in rodents during renal passage and excreted in the urine as a mixture of intact protein and albumin-derived fragments. The aim of this study was to examine whether albumin is metabolized during renal passage in nondiabetic volunteers and in type 1 diabetic patients with varying levels of albuminuria. Nine nondiabetic normoalbuminuric volunteers and 11 type 1 diabetic patients with albumin excretion rates varying from normoalbuminuria to macroalbuminuria were studied. Each subject received an intravenous injection of tritium-labeled albumin ([3H]-albumin). Urine was collected at 4 h and 24 h after injection and analyzed by size exclusion chromatography. The amount of intact and fragmented albumin was quantified, and each fraction was analyzed by radioimmunoassay (RIA) for albumin. [3H]-albumin in nondiabetic volunteers was metabolized during renal passage to small peptide fragments not detectable by conventional RIA (only 0.05-3.8% of the total urinary radioactivity was associated with intact albumin). The process responsible for albumin fragmentation was similar in diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria (intact albumin represented 0.01-4.0% of total urinary radioactivity). However, there was a reduction in the fragmentation ratio (fragmented:intact) in diabetic patients with micro- or macroalbuminuria (intact albumin represented 2.7-55.5%, P = 0.048). This change in the fragmentation ratio was directly related to the degree of albuminuria. These results have important implications for understanding the mechanisms underlying albuminuria in nondiabetic volunteers and type 1 diabetic patients. In nondiabetic volunteers, the renal processing of albumin involves a relatively rapid and comprehensive degradation of albumin to small fragments (range 1-15 kDa). The degradation process is inhibited in diabetic nephropathy in proportion to the level of albuminuria detected by RIA.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAdulten
dc.subject.otherAgeden
dc.subject.otherAlbuminuriaen
dc.subject.otherDiabetes Mellitus, Type 1.physiopathology.urineen
dc.subject.otherDiabetic Nephropathies.physiopathology.urineen
dc.subject.otherFemaleen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherKidney.physiopathologyen
dc.subject.otherLysosomes.metabolismen
dc.subject.otherMaleen
dc.subject.otherMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.otherReference Valuesen
dc.subject.otherSerum Albumin.metabolismen
dc.subject.otherTritiumen
dc.titleAlbuminuria in patients with type 1 diabetes is directly linked to changes in the lysosome-mediated degradation of albumin during renal passage.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleDiabetesen
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Medicine, Austin & Repatriation Medical Center, University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australiaen
dc.description.pages1579-84en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10969843en
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.languageiso639-1en-
crisitem.author.deptEndocrinology-
crisitem.author.deptMolecular Imaging and Therapy-
crisitem.author.deptEndocrinology-
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