Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/9204
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dc.contributor.authorBass, Sen
dc.contributor.authorBradney, Men
dc.contributor.authorPearce, Gen
dc.contributor.authorHendrich, Een
dc.contributor.authorInge, Ken
dc.contributor.authorStuckey, Sen
dc.contributor.authorLo, S Ken
dc.contributor.authorSeeman, Egoen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-15T22:12:34Z
dc.date.available2015-05-15T22:12:34Z
dc.date.issued2000-02-01en
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal of Pediatrics; 136(2): 149-55en
dc.identifier.govdoc10657818en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/9204en
dc.description.abstractDelays in bone age, the onset of puberty, and skeletal growth in gymnasts could be, in part, the reason for an interest in gymnastics, rather than being the result of vigorous exercise. We hypothesized that short stature and delayed bone age are present at the start of gymnastics, and training delays growth, producing short stature, even after retirement.Sitting height and leg length were measured in 83 active female gymnasts, 42 retired gymnasts, and 154 healthy control subjects. Results were expressed as age-specific SD scores (mean +/- SEM).In the cross-sectional data, active gymnasts had delayed bone age (1.3 +/- 0.1 years), reduced height -1.32 +/- 0.08 SD, sitting height -1.24 +/- 0.09 SD, and leg length, -1.25 +/- 0.08 SD (all P <.001). However, in those training for less than 2 years, the deficit was confined to leg length (-0.8 +/- 0.2 SD). During 2 years of follow-up of 21 gymnasts, only the deficit in sitting height worsened (by 0.4 +/- 0.1 SD). In 13 gymnasts followed up in the immediate 12 months after retirement, sitting height accelerated, resulting in a lessening of the deficit in sitting height by 0.46 +/- 0.14 SD (P <.01). Adult gymnasts who had been retired for 8 years had no deficit in sitting height, leg length, or menstrual dysfunction.Short stature in active gymnasts is partly due to selection of individuals with reduced leg length. Reduced sitting height is likely to be acquired but is reversible with cessation of gymnastics. A history of gymnastic training does not appear to result in reduced stature or menstrual dysfunction in adulthood.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAdolescenten
dc.subject.otherAdulten
dc.subject.otherAge Determination by Skeletonen
dc.subject.otherBody Heighten
dc.subject.otherBone Densityen
dc.subject.otherBone Developmenten
dc.subject.otherChilden
dc.subject.otherChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.otherCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.otherEnergy Intakeen
dc.subject.otherFemaleen
dc.subject.otherGymnasticsen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherLeg.anatomy & histologyen
dc.subject.otherPhysical Education and Trainingen
dc.subject.otherPuberty, Delayed.epidemiology.etiologyen
dc.subject.otherSelection Biasen
dc.subject.otherTime Factorsen
dc.titleShort stature and delayed puberty in gymnasts: influence of selection bias on leg length and the duration of training on trunk length.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleThe Journal of pediatricsen
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Endocrinology, Austin and Repatriation Medical Center, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australiaen
dc.description.pages149-55en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10657818en
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
crisitem.author.deptEndocrinology-
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