Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34250
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dc.contributor.authorKorman, Ben-
dc.contributor.authorDash, Ranjan K-
dc.contributor.authorPeyton, Philip J-
dc.date.accessioned2023-11-15T05:28:15Z-
dc.date.available2023-11-15T05:28:15Z-
dc.date.issued2023-11-
dc.identifier.citationPhysiological Reports 2023-11; 11(21)en_US
dc.identifier.issn2051-817X-
dc.identifier.urihttps://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34250-
dc.description.abstractWe have investigated the elimination of inert gases in the lung during the elimination of nitrous oxide (N2 O) using a two-step mathematical model that allows the contribution from net gas volume expansion, which occurs in Step 2, to be separated from other factors. When a second inert gas is used in addition to N2 O, the effect on that gas appears as an extra volume of the gas eliminated in association with the dilution produced by N2 O washout in Step 2. We first considered the effect of elimination in a single gas-exchanging unit under steady-state conditions and then extended our analysis to a lung having a log-normal distribution of ventilation and perfusion. A further increase in inert gas elimination was demonstrated with gases of low solubility in the presence of the increased ventilation-perfusion mismatch that is known to occur during anesthesia. These effects are transient because N2 O elimination depletes the input of that gas from mixed venous blood to the lung, thereby rapidly reducing the magnitude of the diluting action.en_US
dc.language.isoeng-
dc.subjectanesthetic uptake and eliminationen_US
dc.subjectmathematical modelingen_US
dc.subjectsecond gas effecten_US
dc.subjectventilation-perfusion mismatchen_US
dc.subjectvolume contraction and expansionen_US
dc.titleEffects of N2 O elimination on the elimination of second gases in a two-step mathematical model of heterogeneous gas exchange.en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.journaltitlePhysiological Reportsen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationSchool of Medicine, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.;Department of Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Biomedical Engineering, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA.;Department of Physiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationAnaesthesiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationPerioperative and Pain Medicineen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.14814/phy2.15822en_US
dc.type.contentTexten_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-8946-528Xen_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-1185-2869en_US
dc.identifier.pubmedid37923389-
dc.description.volume11-
dc.description.issue21-
dc.description.startpagee15822-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
crisitem.author.deptAnaesthesia-
crisitem.author.deptInstitute for Breathing and Sleep-
Appears in Collections:Journal articles
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