Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34243
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dc.contributor.authorJanmohamed, Mubeen-
dc.contributor.authorNhu, Duong-
dc.contributor.authorShakathreh, Lubna-
dc.contributor.authorGonen, Ofer-
dc.contributor.authorKuhlman, Levin-
dc.contributor.authorGilligan, Amanda K-
dc.contributor.authorTan, Chang Wei-
dc.contributor.authorPerucca, Piero-
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Terence J-
dc.contributor.authorKwan, Patrick-
dc.date2023-
dc.date.accessioned2023-11-15T05:28:13Z-
dc.date.available2023-11-15T05:28:13Z-
dc.date.issued2023-10-30-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Clinical Neurophysiology: Official Publication of the American Electroencephalographic Society 2023-10-30en_US
dc.identifier.issn1537-1603-
dc.identifier.urihttps://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/34243-
dc.description.abstractDespite availability of commercial EEG software for automated epileptiform detection, validation on real-world EEG datasets is lacking. Performance evaluation of two software packages on a large EEG dataset of patients with genetic generalized epilepsy was performed. Three epileptologists labelled IEDs manually of EEGs from three centres. All Interictal epileptiform discharge (IED) markings predicted by two commercial software (Encevis 1.11 and Persyst 14) were reviewed individually to assess for suspicious missed markings and were integrated into the reference standard if overlooked during manual annotation during a second phase. Sensitivity, precision, specificity, and F1-score were used to assess the performance of the software packages against the adjusted reference standard. One hundred and twenty-five routine scalp EEG recordings from different subjects were included (total recording time, 310.7 hours). The total epileptiform discharge reference count was 5,907 (including spikes and fragments). Encevis demonstrated a mean sensitivity for detection of IEDs of 0.46 (SD 0.32), mean precision of 0.37 (SD 0.31), and mean F1-score of 0.43 (SD 0.23). Using the default medium setting, the sensitivity of Persyst was 0.67 (SD 0.31), with a precision of 0.49 (SD 0.33) and F1-score of 0.51 (SD 0.25). Mean specificity representing non-IED window identification and classification was 0.973 (SD 0.08) for Encevis and 0.968 (SD 0.07) for Persyst. Automated software shows a high degree of specificity for detection of nonepileptiform background. Sensitivity and precision for IED detection is lower, but may be acceptable for initial screening in the clinical and research setting. Clinical caution and continuous expert human oversight are recommended with all EEG recordings before a diagnostic interpretation is provided based on the output of the software.en_US
dc.language.isoeng-
dc.titleComparison of Automated Spike Detection Software in Detecting Epileptiform Abnormalities on Scalp-EEG of Genetic Generalized Epilepsy Patients.en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.journaltitleJournal of Clinical Neurophysiology: Official Publication of the American Electroencephalographic Societyen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Neuroscience, Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.;Department of Neurology, Alfred Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.;Department of Neurology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Data Science and AI, Faculty of IT, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Neurology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Neuroscience, Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Data Science and AI, Faculty of IT, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationNeurosciences Clinical Institute, Epworth Healthcare Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Data Science and AI, Faculty of IT, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Neurology, Alfred Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.;en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Neurology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Neuroscience, Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.;Department of Neurology, Alfred Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationEpilepsy Research Centreen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationNeurologyen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/WNP.0000000000001039en_US
dc.type.contentTexten_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0001-8601-3686en_US
dc.identifier.pubmedid37934089-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
crisitem.author.deptNeurology-
crisitem.author.deptNeurology-
crisitem.author.deptComprehensive Epilepsy Program-
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