Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/32752
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dc.contributor.authorChua, Wei Ling-
dc.contributor.authorWee, Li-Phing Clarice-
dc.contributor.authorLim, Jia Ying Germaine-
dc.contributor.authorYeo, Min Li Kimberly-
dc.contributor.authorJones, Daryl A-
dc.contributor.authorTan, Chee Keat-
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Faheem Ahmed-
dc.contributor.authorLiaw, Sok Ying-
dc.date2023-
dc.date.accessioned2023-04-26T05:24:21Z-
dc.date.available2023-04-26T05:24:21Z-
dc.date.issued2023-09-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Clinical Nursing 2023-09; 32(17-18)en_US
dc.identifier.issn1365-2702-
dc.identifier.urihttps://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/32752-
dc.description.abstractTo explore general ward nurses' attitudes and perceptions towards recognising and responding to clinical deterioration in a hospital with automated rapid response system activation. There is growing interest in deploying automated clinical deterioration notification systems to reduce delayed or failed recognition and response to clinical deterioration of ward patients. However, little is known about its impact on ward nurses' perspectives and work patterns. A mixed-methods study. Online survey of 168 registered nurses and individual interviews with 10 registered nurses in one acute hospital in Singapore. The study adhered to the STROBE checklist for cross-sectional studies and the COREQ guidelines for qualitative studies. Many nurses (38.1%) rarely performed patient assessments or observations other than vital signs assessment to assess for early signs of clinical deterioration. About 30% were worried about being criticised for calling the primary team doctors. Four themes emerged from the qualitative analysis: automated rapid response system activation as a safety net, being more cautious with vital signs monitoring, the NEWS2 alone is inadequate, and ward nurses as the 'middleman' between the intensive care unit outreach nurse and primary team doctors. Although nurses value the automated rapid response system activation as a safety net to minimise delays in accessing urgent critical care resources, it does not address the sociocultural barriers inherent in escalation of care. Although the automated system led nurses to be more cautious with vital signs monitoring, it does not encourage them to perform comprehensive patient assessments to detect early signs of deterioration. Nurse education on assessing for clinical deterioration should focus on the use of broader patient assessment skills other than vital signs. Sociocultural barriers to escalation of care remain a key issue that needs to be addressed by hospital management. No patients, service users, care-givers or members of the public were involved in the study.en_US
dc.language.isoeng-
dc.subjectautomated notification systemen_US
dc.subjectclinical deteriorationen_US
dc.subjectcritical care outreachen_US
dc.subjectearly warning scoreen_US
dc.subjectescalation of careen_US
dc.subjectmixed-methodsen_US
dc.subjectnursesen_US
dc.subjectpatient assessmenten_US
dc.subjectrapid response systemen_US
dc.subjectreal-time e-alerten_US
dc.titleAutomated rapid response system activation-Impact on nurses' attitudes and perceptions towards recognising and responding to clinical deterioration: Mixed-methods study.en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.journaltitleJournal of Clinical Nursingen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationAlice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Nursing Administration, Ng Teng Fong General Hospital, National University Health System, Singapore.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Nursing, Ng Teng Fong General Hospital, National University Health System, Singapore.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationIntensive Careen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, Ng Teng Fong General Hospital, National University Health System, Singapore.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationSchool of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbou Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationAlice Lee Centre for Nursing Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Critical Care, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jocn.16734en_US
dc.type.contentTexten_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-4870-2728en_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-8326-4049en_US
dc.identifier.pubmedid37087695-
local.name.researcherJones, Daryl A-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
crisitem.author.deptIntensive Care-
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