Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/32615
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dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Lauren M-
dc.contributor.authorYoussef, George J-
dc.contributor.authorGreenwood, Christopher J-
dc.contributor.authorEnticott, Peter G-
dc.contributor.authorCurtis, Ashlee-
dc.contributor.authorGraeme, Liam G-
dc.contributor.authorMansour, Kayla A-
dc.contributor.authorOlsson, Craig A-
dc.contributor.authorSkouteris, Helen-
dc.contributor.authorMilgrom, Jeannette-
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Joanne-
dc.contributor.authorKnight, Tess-
dc.contributor.authorMacdonald, Jacqui A-
dc.date2023-
dc.date.accessioned2023-04-14T02:47:11Z-
dc.date.available2023-04-14T02:47:11Z-
dc.date.issued2023-
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Psychology 2023; 14: 1114084en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/32615-
dc.description.abstractParent anger presents a risk to family safety and child development. Father trait anger may also compromise the early relational context of fathers and offspring, yet evidence is lacking. The aim of this study is to examine effects of father trait anger on parenting stress in the toddler years, and the mediational role of father-infant bonding. Data were from 177 Australian fathers of 205 children. Trait anger (total, angry temperament, and angry reaction), father-infant bonding subscales (patience and tolerance, affection and pride, and pleasure in interaction), and subsequent parenting stress (parental distress, difficult child, and parent-child dysfunctional interaction) were assessed. At each of the subscale levels, mediational path models examined whether father-infant bonding explained the relationship between trait anger and parenting stress. Models were presented where there was at least a small association between the mediator and both the predictor and outcome. Patience and tolerance was the only domain of father-infant bonding correlated with both trait anger and all parenting stress outcomes. Patience and tolerance partially mediated the effect of total trait anger on parental distress and fully mediated effects on difficult child and parent-child dysfunctional interaction. Patience and tolerance fully mediated relationships between angry temperament and all domains of parenting stress. Angry reactions only had a direct effect on parental distress. Father trait anger both directly and indirectly (through patience and tolerance in the father-infant bond) impacts their experiences of parenting stress in the toddler years. Early interventions to manage father trait anger and improve father-infant bonding may benefit fathers and children.en_US
dc.language.isoeng-
dc.subjectangeren_US
dc.subjectbondingen_US
dc.subjectchildrenen_US
dc.subjectfathersen_US
dc.subjectinfantsen_US
dc.subjectlongitudinalen_US
dc.subjectparenting stressen_US
dc.titleFather trait anger: Associations with father-infant bonding and subsequent parenting stress.en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.journaltitleFrontiers in Psychologyen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationCentre for Social and Early Emotional Development, School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationCentre for Social and Early Emotional Development, School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia.;Centre for Adolescent Health, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationCentre for Social and Early Emotional Development, School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia.;Centre for Adolescent Health, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationCentre for Social and Early Emotional Development, School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationCentre for Drug Use, Addictive and Anti-social Behaviour Research, School of Psychology, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationCentre for Social and Early Emotional Development, School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationCentre for Social and Early Emotional Development, School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationCentre for Social and Early Emotional Development, School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia.;Centre for Adolescent Health, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.;Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationHealth and Social Care Unit, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.;Warwick Business School, Warwick University, Coventry, United Kingdom.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationMelbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Health Sciences and Biostatistics, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC, Australia.;School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University Faculty of Health, Burwood, VIC, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationCairnmillar Institute, Hawthorn East, VIC, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationCentre for Social and Early Emotional Development, School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia.;Centre for Adolescent Health, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.;Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia.en_US
dc.identifier.affiliationParent-Infant Research Instituteen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2023.1114084en_US
dc.type.contentTexten_US
dc.identifier.pubmedid36968729-
dc.description.volume14-
dc.description.startpage1114084-
local.name.researcherMilgrom, Jeannette
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.grantfulltextnone-
crisitem.author.deptParent-Infant Research Institute-
crisitem.author.deptClinical and Health Psychology-
Appears in Collections:Journal articles
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