Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/26172
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dc.contributor.authorSprogis, Stephanie K-
dc.contributor.authorCurrey, Judy-
dc.contributor.authorJones, Daryl A-
dc.contributor.authorConsidine, Julie-
dc.date2021-03-29-
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-08T02:43:46Z-
dc.date.available2021-04-08T02:43:46Z-
dc.date.issued2021-03-29-
dc.identifier.citationIntensive & Critical Care Nursing 2021; online first: 29 Marchen
dc.identifier.urihttps://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/26172-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this review was to explore use of the pre-Medical Emergency Team (pre-MET) tier of Rapid Response Systems to recognise and respond to adult ward patients experiencing early clinical deterioration. A scoping review of studies published in English reporting on use of a pre-MET tier in adult ward patients was conducted. Three databases were searched (Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE) for studies published between January 1995 and September 2020. Two researchers independently performed screening and quality assessments. Findings were synthesised thematically. Reporting of the review was guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Extension for Scoping Reviews. Six of 1669 studies were included in this review. All were single-site studies of single-parameter Rapid Response Systems in Australian hospitals. Five were quantitative studies; one had a qualitative design. Studies fulfilled 50-100% of quality criteria. Two themes were constructed: Afferent processes - Recognising and escalating pre-MET events; and Efferent processes - Pre-MET reviews and associated interventions. There was disparity between clinical practice and pre-MET escalation protocols, and reports of nurse-initiated management of early deterioration. Prospective methods and exploration of multidisciplinary perspectives were notable research gaps. Use of the pre-MET tier of Rapid Response Systems is under-researched. Further research is needed to understand barriers and facilitators influencing use of pre-MET strategies to address patient deterioration.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectClinical deteriorationen
dc.subjectEarly medical interventionen
dc.subjectHospital rapid response teamen
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subjectPatient care teamen
dc.subjectPatient safetyen
dc.titleUse of the pre-medical emergency team tier of rapid response systems: A scoping Review.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleIntensive & Critical Care Nursingen
dc.identifier.affiliationDeakin University: School of Nursing and Midwifery & Centre for Quality and Patient Safety in the Institute for Health Transformation, 1 Gheringhap St, Geelong, Victoria 3220, Australiaen
dc.identifier.affiliationDeakin University: Deakin Learning Futures, Office of the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Education), 1 Gheringhap St, Geelong, Victoria 3220, Australiaen
dc.identifier.affiliationSchool of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Wellington Rd, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australiaen
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Surgery, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australiaen
dc.identifier.affiliationDeakin University: School of Nursing and Midwifery & Centre for Quality and Patient Safety in the Institute for Health Transformation, 1 Gheringhap St, Geelong, Victoria 3220, Australiaen
dc.identifier.affiliationCentre for Quality and Patient Safety Research - Eastern Health Partnership, 2/5 Arnold St, Box Hill, Victoria 3128, Australiaen
dc.identifier.affiliationIntensive Careen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.iccn.2021.103041en
dc.type.contentTexten
dc.identifier.pubmedid33795182
Appears in Collections:Journal articles
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