Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/22077
Title: Advance care planning in COPD: guidance development for healthcare professionals.
Austin Authors: Meehan, Elaine;Sweeney, Catherine;Foley, Tony;Lehane, Elaine;Burgess Kelleher, Art;Hally, Ruth M;Shanagher, Deirdre;Korn, Bettina;Rabbitte, Mary;Detering, Karen M ;Cornally, Nicola
Affiliation: School of Nursing and Midwifery, Cork, Ireland
School of Medicine, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
School of Nursing and Midwifery, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
School of Medicine, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
School of Nursing and Midwifery, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
Irish Hospice Foundation, Dublin, Ireland
Hospice Friendly Hospital Programme, St. James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland
All Ireland Institute of Hospice and Palliative Care, Dublin, Ireland
Advance Care Planning Australia, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Faculty of Medicine Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
School of Nursing and Midwifery, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland n.cornally@ucc.ie
Issue Date: 4-Nov-2019
metadata.dc.date: 2019-11-04
Publication information: BMJ supportive & palliative care 2019; online first: 4 November
Abstract: To examine current practices, attitudes and levels of confidence related to advance care planning (ACP) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among healthcare professionals working in Ireland. This will inform future clinical guidance development. A cross-sectional survey of healthcare professionals. There were 143 participants (109 general practitioners, 25 nurses, 7 physiotherapists and 2 consultant physicians). The majority (82%, n=117) cared for patients with COPD weekly, but only 23% (n=33) had initiated ACP with a patient with COPD over the previous 6 months. Overall, 59% (n=85) answered ≥6 of 8 general knowledge questions correctly. Participants demonstrated positive attitudes towards ACP (mean score 3.6/5.0), but confidence levels were low (2.2/4.0). Most thought ACP was appropriate for patients with severe or very severe COPD (71%, n=101%, and 91%, n=130, respectively) but were unsure or felt that it was not appropriate for those with mild-moderate COPD. However, almost all participants (97%, n=139) stated that if a patient expressed a desire to have ACP discussions, they would comply. Topics most likely to be discussed related to diagnosis and treatment options. Death and end-of-life issues were rarely discussed. The death of a family member or friend and participation in support groups were identified as new 'triggers' for initiating ACP. Targeted education to improve general knowledge and confidence levels among healthcare professionals, together with initiatives to increase public awareness of ACP so that patients themselves might be more inclined to start the discussion, may help increase the uptake of ACP for this patient group.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/22077
DOI: 10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-002002
ORCID: 0000-0003-2393-6939
0000-0002-1884-7272
PubMed URL: 31685522
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: advance care planning
chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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