Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/21894
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dc.contributor.authorToukhsati, Samia R-
dc.contributor.authorMathews, S-
dc.contributor.authorSheed, A-
dc.contributor.authorFreijah, I-
dc.contributor.authorMoncur, L-
dc.contributor.authorCropper, P-
dc.contributor.authorHa, Francis J-
dc.contributor.authorHare, David L-
dc.date2019-10-08-
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-14T04:15:38Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-14T04:15:38Z-
dc.date.issued2020-02-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing 2020; 19(2): 165-171en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/21894-
dc.description.abstractLow confidence to exercise is a barrier to engaging in exercise in heart failure patients. Participating in low to moderate intensity exercise, such as the six-minute walk test, may increase exercise confidence. To compare the effects of a six-minute walk test with an educational control condition on exercise confidence in heart failure patients. This was a prospective, quasi-experimental design whereby consecutive adult patients attending an out-patient heart failure clinic completed the Exercise Confidence Scale prior to and following involvement in the six-minute walk test or an educational control condition. Using a matched pairs, mixed model design (n=60; 87% male; Mage=58.87±13.16), we identified a significantly greater improvement in Total exercise confidence (F(1,54)=4.63, p=0.036, partial η2=0.079) and Running confidence (F(1,57)=4.21, p=0. 045, partial η2=0.069) following the six-minute walk test compared to the educational control condition. These benefits were also observed after adjustment for age, gender, functional class and depression. Heart failure patients who completed a six-minute walk test reported greater improvement in exercise confidence than those who read an educational booklet for 10 min. The findings suggest that the six-minute walk test may be used as a clinical tool to improve exercise confidence. Future research should test these results under randomized conditions and examine whether improvements in exercise confidence translate to greater engagement in exercise behavior.en_US
dc.language.isoeng-
dc.subjectHeart failureen_US
dc.subjectconfidenceen_US
dc.subjectexerciseen_US
dc.subjectself-efficacyen_US
dc.subjectsix-minute walk testen_US
dc.titleConfirming a beneficial effect of the six-minute walk test on exercise confidence in patients with heart failure.en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.journaltitleEuropean Journal of Cardiovascular Nursingen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationPsychology, School of Health and Life Sciences, Federation University Australia, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationFaculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationCardiologyen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1474515119876784en_US
dc.type.contentTexten_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-3206-5725en_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0001-9554-6556en_US
dc.identifier.pubmedid31590569-
dc.type.austinJournal Article-
local.name.researcherHare, David L
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
crisitem.author.deptCardiology-
crisitem.author.deptCardiology-
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