Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/21377
Title: Effect of Furosemide on Urinary Oxygenation in Patients with Septic Shock.
Austin Authors: Osawa, Eduardo A;Cutuli, Salvatore L ;Bitker, Laurent;Canet, Emmanuel;Cioccari, Luca;Iguchi, Naoya;Lankadeva, Yugeesh R;Eastwood, Glenn M ;Evans, Roger G;May, Clive N;Bellomo, Rinaldo 
Affiliation: Department of Intensive Care, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Pre-clinical Critical Care Unit, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Centre for Integrated Critical Care, Department of Medicine and Radiology, School of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Prahran, Victoria, Australia
Department of Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
Department of Intensive Care, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan
Department of Physiology, Cardiovascular Disease Program, Biomedicine Discovery Institute, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: 2019
metadata.dc.date: 2019-07-23
Publication information: Blood purification 2019; 48(4): 336-345
Abstract: Renal medullary hypoxia precedes the development of acute kidney injury in experimental sepsis and can now be assessed by continuous measurement of urinary oxygen tension (PuO2). We aimed to test if PuO2 measurements in patients with septic shock would be similar to those shown in experimental sepsis and would detect changes induced by the administration of furosemide. Pilot prospective observational cohort study in a tertiary intensive care unit (ICU). Seven adult patients with septic shock admitted to ICU had PuO2 measurements recorded minutely. There were 29 episodes of intravenous furosemide (20 mg n = 19; 40 mg n = 10). The median pre-furosemide PuO2 was low at 21.2 mm Hg (interquartile range [IQR] 17.73-24.86) and increased to 26 mm Hg (IQR 20.27-29.95) at 20 min (p < 0.01), to 27.5 mm Hg (IQR 24.06-33.18) at 40 min (p < 0.01) and to 28.5 mm Hg (IQR 22.65-31.03) at 60 min (p < 0.01). The increase in PuO2 was greater in episodes with a diuretic response >2 mL/kg/h than during episodes without such a response (p < 0.01). PuO2 measurements in patients are reflective of the low values reported in experimental models of sepsis. PuO2 values increased following furosemide administration with a response independently associated with greater diuresis.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/21377
DOI: 10.1159/000501512
ORCID: 0000-0002-1650-8939
PubMed URL: 31336370
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Furosemide
Medullary oxygenation
Sepsis
Septic shock
Urinary output
Urinary oxygenation
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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