Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/17789
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dc.contributor.authorHaines, Kimberley J-
dc.contributor.authorBerney, Susan C-
dc.contributor.authorWarrillow, Stephen J-
dc.contributor.authorDenehy, Linda-
dc.date2018-02-05-
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-28T06:13:45Z-
dc.date.available2018-05-28T06:13:45Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of intensive care 2018; 6: 8-
dc.identifier.issn2052-0492-
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/17789-
dc.description.abstractAlmost all data on 5-year outcomes for critical care survivors come from North America and Europe. The aim of this study was to investigate long-term mortality, physical function, psychological outcomes and health-related quality of life in a mixed intensive care unit cohort in Australia. This longitudinal study evaluated 4- to 5-year outcomes. Physical function (six-minute walk test) and health-related quality of life (Short Form 36 Version 2) were compared to 1-year outcomes and population norms. New psychological data (Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression, Impact of Events Scale) was collected at follow-up. Of the 150 participants, 66 (44%) patients were deceased by follow-up. Fifty-six survivors were included with a mean (SD) age of 64 (14.2). Survivors' mean (SD) six-minute walk distance increased between 1 and 4 to 5 years (465.8 m (148.9) vs. 507.5 m (118.2)) (mean difference = - 24.5 m, CI - 58.3, 9.2, p = 0.15). Depressive symptoms were low: median (IQR) score of 7.0 (1.0-15.0). The mean level of post-traumatic stress symptoms was low-median (IQR) score of 1.0 (0-11.0)-with only 9 (16%) above the threshold for potentially disordered symptoms. Short-Form 36 Physical and Mental Component Scores did not change between 1 and 4 to 5 years (46.4 (7.9) vs. 46.7 (8.1) and 48.8 (13) vs. 48.8 (11.1)) and were within a standard deviation of normal. Outcomes of critical illness are not uniform across nations. Mortality was increased in this cohort; however, survivors achieved a high level of recovery for physical function and health-related quality of life with low psychological morbidity at follow-up. The trial was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12605000776606.-
dc.language.isoeng-
dc.subjectCritical illness-
dc.subjectLong-term outcomes-
dc.titleLong-term recovery following critical illness in an Australian cohort.-
dc.typeJournal Article-
dc.identifier.journaltitleJournal of intensive care-
dc.identifier.affiliationPhysiotherapy Department, Western Health, St. Albans, Victoria, Australia-
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Physiotherapy, Melbourne School of Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia-
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Physiotherapy, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia-
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Intensive Care, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40560-018-0276-x-
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-2882-1594-
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-7240-4106-
dc.identifier.pubmedid29445502-
dc.type.austinJournal Article-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
crisitem.author.deptClinical Education-
crisitem.author.deptPhysiotherapy-
crisitem.author.deptIntensive Care-
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