Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16940
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dc.contributor.authorBond, Katherine A-
dc.contributor.authorFranklin, Lucinda J-
dc.contributor.authorSutton, Brett-
dc.contributor.authorFirestone, Simon M-
dc.date2017-11-10-
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-15T22:43:30Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-15T22:43:30Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-18-
dc.identifier.citationVaccine 2017; 35(51): 7084-7087en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16940-
dc.description.abstractQ-Vax®, a whole cell formalin inactivated vaccine, is currently the only licensed Q fever vaccine for humans world-wide. Efficacy is high, although vaccine failures have been described for those vaccinated within the incubation of a naturally acquired infection. In Australia, it is widely used to prevent occupational acquisition of Q fever and is the mainstay for outbreak control. A retrospective review of all notified cases of acute Q fever to the Victorian department of health, 1993–2013, revealed 34 of 659 cases were previously vaccinated and 10 cases were positive on pre-vaccination screening, precluding vaccination. Twenty-one cases described high-risk exposures for C. burnetii prior to and within 15 days post vaccination and are likely to have been vaccinated within the incubation period of a natural infection. Thirteen cases described symptom onset more than 15 days post vaccination and thus may represent the first described series of Q-Vax vaccine failures following appropriate vaccination.en_US
dc.subjectQ feveren_US
dc.subjectCoxiella burnetiien_US
dc.subjectQ-Vax®en_US
dc.subjectVaccine failureen_US
dc.titleQ-Vax Q fever vaccine failures, Victoria, Australia 1994-2013en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.journaltitleVaccineen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationCommunicable Disease Section, Health Protection Branch, Department of Health and Human Services, Melbourne, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Infectious Diseases, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationAsia-Pacific Centre for Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.pubmedurihttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29132996en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.10.088en_US
dc.type.contentTexten_US
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen_US
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
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