Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16715
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKanaan, Richard A A-
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Roderick-
dc.contributor.authorGoldstein, Laura H-
dc.contributor.authorJankovic, Joseph-
dc.contributor.authorCavanna, Andrea E-
dc.date2017-02-24-
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-13T01:30:50Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-13T01:30:50Z-
dc.date.issued2017-05-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry 2017; 88(5): 425-429en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16715-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are classified with other functional neurological symptoms as 'Conversion Disorder', but there are reasons to wonder whether this symptomatology constitutes a distinct entity. METHODS: We reviewed the literature comparing PNES with other functional neurological symptoms. RESULTS: We find eight studies that directly examined this question. Though all but one found significant differences-notably in presenting age, trauma history, and dissociation-they were divided on whether these differences represented an important distinction. CONCLUSION: We argue that the aetiological and mechanistic distinctions they support, particularly when bolstered by additional data, give reason to sustain a separation between these conditions.en_US
dc.subjectAetiologyen_US
dc.subjectFunctional neurological disorderen_US
dc.subjectMechanismen_US
dc.subjectNosologyen_US
dc.subjectPsychogenic movement disorderen_US
dc.titleAre psychogenic non-epileptic seizures just another symptom of conversion disorder?en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.journaltitleJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatryen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Psychiatry, Austin Health, University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartments of Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UKen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Neurology, University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealanden_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Neurology, Parkinson's Disease Center and Movement Disorders Clinic, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Neuropsychiatry, Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust and University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UKen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationSchool of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, UKen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationSobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, UKen_US
dc.identifier.pubmedurihttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28235779en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jnnp-2017-315639en_US
dc.type.contentTexten_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-0992-1917-
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen_US
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
crisitem.author.deptPsychiatry (University of Melbourne)-
Appears in Collections:Journal articles
Show simple item record

Page view(s)

2
checked on Feb 5, 2023

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.