Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16316
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dc.contributor.authorMalpas, Charles B-
dc.contributor.authorGenc, Sila-
dc.contributor.authorSaling, Michael M-
dc.contributor.authorVelakoulis, Dennis-
dc.contributor.authorDesmond, Patricia M-
dc.contributor.authorO’Brien, Terence J-
dc.date2015-10-09-
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-03T03:06:55Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-03T03:06:55Z-
dc.date.issued2016-02-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Clinical Neuroscience 2016; 24: 128-134en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16316-
dc.description.abstractThere is growing interest in the neurobiological substrate of general intelligence. Psychometric estimates of general intelligence are reduced in a range of neurological disorders, leading to practical application as sensitive, but non-specific, markers of cerebral disorder. This study examined estimates of general intelligence in neurotypical adults using diffusion tensor imaging and resting-state functional connectivity analysis. General intelligence was related to white matter organisation across multiple brain regions, confirming previous work in older healthy adults. We also found that variation in general intelligence was related to a large functional sub-network involving all cortical lobes of the brain. These findings confirm that individual variance in general intelligence is related to diffusely represented brain networks.en_US
dc.subjectDiffusion MRIen_US
dc.subjectFunctional connectivityen_US
dc.subjectIntelligenceen_US
dc.subjectBrainen_US
dc.subjectResting stateen_US
dc.subjectWhite matteren_US
dc.titleMRI correlates of general intelligence in neurotypical adultsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.journaltitleJournal of Clinical Neuroscienceen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationMelbourne Brain Centre, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationMelbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDevelopmental Imaging, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Radiology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Neuropsychology, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationMelbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Medical Imaging, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.pubmedurihttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26455546en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jocn.2015.07.012en_US
dc.type.contentTexten_US
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen_US
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
crisitem.author.deptClinical Neuropsychology-
crisitem.author.deptThe Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health-
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