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dc.contributor.authorElliott, Rohan A-
dc.date2016-06-13-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-06T02:43:32Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-06T02:43:32Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Pharmacy Practice and Research 2016; 46(2): 169-177en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16188-
dc.descriptionThis article is the first of two articles written to celebrate the 30th Anniversary of the ‘Geriatric Therapeutics Review’ series of articles. The series was started by Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital (HRH) pharmacists Robyn Saunders and Geoff Sussman and geriatrician Dr David Fonda in 1986. It was initially an in-house publication at HRH, but in 1991 it became a regular feature of the Journal of Pharmacy Practice and Research.en_US
dc.description.abstractModern geriatric medicine evolved in Britain between the 1930s and 1970s. In Australia, the first comprehensive geriatric service was described in the 1950s. However, it was not until the 1980s that geriatric medicine began to gain widespread acceptance as a medical specialty. There has been a slow but steady growth in geriatric services in most developed countries since that time, and more recently in developing nations. Various models of geriatric medical care have been developed, including geriatrician-led geriatric evaluation and management (GEM) services and shared-care services such as orthogeriatrics. The number of older people, often with multiple comorbidities and geriatric syndromes, seen in most areas of medical and surgical practice has risen significantly over recent decades, and as a result some of the principles of geriatric medicine, in particular ‘comprehensive geriatric assessment’, have been adopted outside of specialist geriatric services, including the primary care setting. Managing and preventing iatrogenic disease and polypharmacy became an important element of geriatric medicine as the range of therapeutic drugs grew and life expectancy and multi-morbidity increased. Geriatric pharmacy practice evolved in the mid-1970s in the USA, and the 1980s–1990s in other developed countries. It was recognised as a specialty with the introduction of the Certified Geriatric Pharmacist credential in 1997. This paper describes the evolution of the principles and practice of geriatric medicine and pharmacy practice.en_US
dc.subjectGeriatric medicineen_US
dc.subjectPharmacy practiceen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.titleGeriatric medicine and pharmacy practice: a historical perspectiveen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.journaltitleJournal of Pharmacy Practice and Researchen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationPharmacy Department, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationCentre for Medicine Use and Safety, Monash University, Parkville, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.type.studyortrialNarrative Reviewsen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jppr.1214en_US
dc.type.contentTexten_US
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen_US
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.grantfulltextopen-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
crisitem.author.deptPharmacy-
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