Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/13695
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorPhysiotherapy Department, Austin Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia-
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Meg E-
dc.contributor.authorAdair, Brooke-
dc.contributor.authorOzanne, Elizabeth-
dc.contributor.authorKurowski, William-
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Kimberly J-
dc.contributor.authorPearce, Alan J-
dc.contributor.authorSantamaria, Nick-
dc.contributor.authorLong, Maureen-
dc.contributor.authorVentura, Cameron-
dc.contributor.authorSaid, Catherine M-
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-01T02:42:03Z
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-11T06:09:41Z
dc.date.available2015-10-01T02:42:03Z
dc.date.available2015-09-11T06:09:41Z
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationAustralasian Journal on Ageing 2014, vol. 33(3) p. 142-152.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/13695-
dc.description.abstractAIM: To examine the effectiveness of smart technologies in improving or maintaining the social connectedness of older people living at home. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and critical evaluation of research articles published between 2000 and 2013. Article screening, data extraction and quality assessment (using the Downs and Black checklist) were conducted by two independent researchers. RESULTS: Eighteen publications were identified that evaluated the effect of smart technologies on dimensions of social connectedness. Fourteen studies reported positive outcomes in aspects such as social support, isolation and loneliness. There was emerging evidence that some technologies augmented the beneficial effects of more traditional aged-care services. CONCLUSION: Smart technologies, such as tailored internet programs, may help older people better manage and understand various health conditions, resulting in subsequent improvements in aspects of social connectedness. Further research is required regarding how technological innovations could be promoted, marketed and implemented to benefit older people.en_US
dc.subjectAge Factorsen_US
dc.subjectAging/psychologyen_US
dc.subjectAttitude to Computersen_US
dc.subjectCell Phonesen_US
dc.subjectComputersen_US
dc.subjectIndependent Living/psychologyen_US
dc.subjectInterneten_US
dc.subjectInterpersonal Relationsen_US
dc.subjectLonelinessen_US
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subjectSocial Isolationen_US
dc.subjectSocial Supporten_US
dc.titleSmart technologies to enhance social connectedness in older people who live at homeen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.journaltitleAustralasian Journal on Ageingen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australiaen
dc.identifier.pubmedurihttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=24730370en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ajag.12154en_US
dc.type.contentTexten_US
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen_US
local.name.researcherSaid, Catherine M
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
crisitem.author.deptPhysiotherapy-
Appears in Collections:Journal articles
Show simple item record

Page view(s)

24
checked on Feb 29, 2024

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.