Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/13301
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dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Richard Een
dc.contributor.authorTsalamandris, Conen
dc.contributor.authorBach, Leon Aen
dc.contributor.authorPanagiotopoulos, Siannaen
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, R Cen
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Terri Jen
dc.contributor.authorGoodall, Ien
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Ven
dc.contributor.authorSeeman, Egoen
dc.contributor.authorMurray, R Men
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-16T03:07:40Z-
dc.date.available2015-05-16T03:07:40Z-
dc.date.issued1993-10-01en
dc.identifier.citationKidney International; 44(4): 855-9en
dc.identifier.govdoc8258961en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttps://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/13301en
dc.description.abstractIn this prospective study of 11.9 years duration (range 9 to 14), we examined the progression of albuminuria prior to and after the onset of microalbuminuria [albumin excretion rate (AER): 20 to 200 micrograms/minute]. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1), AER and blood pressure were measured every six months. Twenty-two (13 type I, 9 type II) patients were identified in whom AER increased progressively (progressors). These patients were compared with 22 others matched for age, duration and type of diabetes in whom AER did not change significantly during the study period (non-progressors). In the progressors, the rate of increase in AER correlated with mean HbA1 for the study period in patients with type I (r = 0.68, P < 0.01) and type II diabetes (r = 0.71, P < 0.05). Furthermore, AER began increasing well before the conventional 20 micrograms/minute threshold of microalbuminuria had been reached and within the first five years of diagnosis of type I diabetes. We conclude that in predisposed diabetic patients, long-term glycemic control is correlated with the rate of development of early renal abnormalities. Repeated measurements of AER from the time of diagnosis may be useful in the early detection of patients who will develop microalbuminuria and ultimately overt diabetic nephropathy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAdolescenten
dc.subject.otherAdulten
dc.subject.otherAgeden
dc.subject.otherAlbuminuria.urineen
dc.subject.otherBlood Glucose.analysisen
dc.subject.otherBlood Pressureen
dc.subject.otherChilden
dc.subject.otherDiabetes Mellitus, Type 1.blood.physiopathologyen
dc.subject.otherDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2.blood.physiopathologyen
dc.subject.otherDiabetic Nephropathies.physiopathologyen
dc.subject.otherFemaleen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherMaleen
dc.subject.otherMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.otherProspective Studiesen
dc.titleLong-term glycemic control and the rate of progression of early diabetic kidney disease.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleKidney Internationalen
dc.identifier.affiliationEndocrinology Unit, Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australiaen
dc.description.pages855-9en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8258961en
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-0845-0001-
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
local.name.researcherPanagiotopoulos, Sianna
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
crisitem.author.deptOffice for Research-
crisitem.author.deptEndocrinology-
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