Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12116
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Anthony Len
dc.contributor.authorParker, Shefton Jen
dc.contributor.authorSmit, De Villiersen
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, David McDen
dc.contributor.authorXue, Charlie C Len
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-16T01:45:53Z
dc.date.available2015-05-16T01:45:53Z
dc.date.issued2014-03-07en
dc.identifier.citationAcupuncture in Medicine : Journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society 2014; 32(3): 250-6en
dc.identifier.govdoc24610638en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12116en
dc.description.abstractTo evaluate the feasibility of delivering acupuncture in an emergency department (ED) to patients presenting with pain and/or nausea.A feasibility study (with historical controls) undertaken at the Northern Hospital ED in Melbourne, Australia, involving people presenting to ED triage with pain (VAS 0-10) and/or nausea (Morrow Index 1-6) between January and August 2010 (n=400). The acupuncture group comprised 200 patients who received usual medical care and acupuncture; the usual care group comprised 200 patients with retrospective data closely matched from ED electronic health records.Refusal rate was 31%, with 'symptoms under control owing to medical treatment before acupuncture' the most prevalent reason for refusal (n=36); 52.5% of participants responded 'definitely yes' for their willingness to repeat acupuncture, and a further 31.8% responded 'probably yes'. Over half (57%) reported a satisfaction score of 10 for acupuncture treatment. Musculoskeletal conditions were the most common conditions treated n=117 (58.5%), followed by abdominal or flank pain n=49 (24.5%). Adverse events were rare (2%) and mild. Pain and nausea scores reduced from a mean±SD of 7.01±2.02 before acupuncture to 4.72±2.62 after acupuncture and from 2.6±2.19 to 1.42±1.86, respectively.Acupuncture in the ED appears safe and acceptable for patients with pain and/or nausea. Results suggest combined care may provide effective pain and nausea relief in ED patients. Further high-quality, sufficiently powered randomised studies evaluating the cost-effectiveness and efficacy of the add-on effect of acupuncture are recommended.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherACCIDENT & EMERGENCY MEDICINEen
dc.subject.otherACUPUNCTUREen
dc.subject.otherCOMPLEMENTARY MEDICINEen
dc.subject.otherPAIN MANAGEMENTen
dc.subject.otherPAIN RESEARCHen
dc.subject.otherAcupuncture Therapyen
dc.subject.otherAdulten
dc.subject.otherAgeden
dc.subject.otherAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.otherEmergency Medical Servicesen
dc.subject.otherEmergency Service, Hospital.statistics & numerical dataen
dc.subject.otherFeasibility Studiesen
dc.subject.otherFemaleen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherMaleen
dc.subject.otherMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.otherNausea.therapyen
dc.subject.otherPain Managementen
dc.subject.otherRetrospective Studiesen
dc.subject.otherYoung Adulten
dc.titleAcupuncture and standard emergency department care for pain and/or nausea and its impact on emergency care delivery: a feasibility study.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleAcupuncture in medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Societyen
dc.identifier.affiliationEmergency and Trauma Centre, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australiaen
dc.identifier.affiliationSchool of Health Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australiaen
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Emergency, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australiaen
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/acupmed-2013-010501en
dc.description.pages250-6en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24610638en
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.grantfulltextnone-
crisitem.author.deptEmergency-
Appears in Collections:Journal articles
Show simple item record

Page view(s)

6
checked on Feb 2, 2023

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.