Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11797
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dc.contributor.authorGemmill, Alan W-
dc.contributor.authorWorotniuk, Tamara-
dc.contributor.authorHolt, Christopher J-
dc.contributor.authorSkouteris, Helen-
dc.contributor.authorMilgrom, Jeannette-
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-16T01:25:31Z
dc.date.available2015-05-16T01:25:31Z
dc.date.issued2013-06-19-
dc.identifier.citationChildhood Obesity (print) 2013; 9(4): 326-37en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11797en
dc.description.abstractThe rise of childhood obesity in Western society has focused attention on parental feeding practices. Despite evidence that controlled feeding influences child weight, there is a paucity of research examining predictors of controlled feeding. The aim of this study was to determine whether maternal antenatal and/or concurrent anxiety and depressive symptoms, including stress, predicted controlled feeding and whether maternal controlled feeding practices, in turn, predict child BMI.In total, 203 mothers participated in a longitudinal follow-up survey. Mothers' self-reported symptoms of anxiety and depression were measured both in pregnancy and at 2-7 years postpartum. Maternal-reported child BMI and maternal use of restriction, pressure to eat, and monitoring were measured at 2-7 years postpartum.Feeding practices were not uniformly predictive of child BMI. Maternal use of restriction and monitoring were partially positively predicted by concurrent maternal stress and negatively partially predicted by concurrent depression. Thus, mothers enduring high stress appeared to employ more controlled feeding patterns, whereas mothers experiencing depression seemingly employed lower levels of controlled feeding.Findings that maternal anxiety and depression affect levels of controlled feeding are of particular interest and broadly supportive of the few existing studies. Given the mixed results linking controlled feeding to child BMI reported in previous research, further work is required to determine the relationships between maternal mood, child feeding practices, and BMI.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAdulten
dc.subject.otherAnxiety.epidemiology.psychologyen
dc.subject.otherAustralia.epidemiologyen
dc.subject.otherBody Mass Indexen
dc.subject.otherChilden
dc.subject.otherChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.otherDepression.epidemiology.psychologyen
dc.subject.otherEmotionsen
dc.subject.otherFeeding Behavior.psychologyen
dc.subject.otherFemaleen
dc.subject.otherFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherLongitudinal Studiesen
dc.subject.otherMaleen
dc.subject.otherMaternal Behavior.psychologyen
dc.subject.otherMother-Child Relationsen
dc.subject.otherMothers.psychologyen
dc.subject.otherParentingen
dc.subject.otherPediatric Obesity.epidemiology.prevention & control.psychologyen
dc.subject.otherProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.otherQuestionnairesen
dc.subject.otherWeight Gainen
dc.titleMaternal psychological factors and controlled child feeding practices in relation to child body mass index.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleChildhood obesity (Print)en
dc.identifier.affiliationParent-Infant Research Instituteen
dc.identifier.affiliationClinical and Health Psychologyen
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/chi.2012.0135en
dc.description.pages326-37en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23782306en
dc.type.contentTexten
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-4082-4595en
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
crisitem.author.deptParent-Infant Research Institute-
crisitem.author.deptParent-Infant Research Institute-
crisitem.author.deptClinical and Health Psychology-
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