Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11653
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dc.contributor.authorConsidine, Julieen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Daryl Aen
dc.contributor.authorBellomo, Rinaldoen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-16T01:16:13Z
dc.date.available2015-05-16T01:16:13Z
dc.date.issued2013-12-01en
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Emergency Medicine : Official Journal of the European Society For Emergency Medicine; 20(6): 375-81en
dc.identifier.govdoc23325146en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11653en
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this paper, is to present a case to develop and test emergency department (ED)-specific approaches to improve the sequential detection, recognition and timely escalation of care for ED patients who have deteriorated after their initial triage and assessment.Managing the risk of clinical deterioration is a key feature of emergency care and underpins practice. However, although the epidemiology of deterioration in hospitalized ward patients has been well studied, the epidemiology of deterioration in ED patients is less understood. As ED workloads continue to increase, an emerging challenge for ED clinicians is how best to recognize and rapidly respond to deteriorating ED patients following triage and/or medical assessment. Rapid response systems for such patients exist in hospital wards; however, the use of rapid response systems in EDs is variable and largely unknown outside the UK.A systematic approach to the early recognition of, and response to, deteriorating ED patients across the entire ED trajectory of care remains untested. Given the complexities of the ED environment, ward-based models of recognizing and responding to deteriorating patients may not meet the specific needs of the ED.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherCritical Illness.mortality.therapyen
dc.subject.otherDisease Progressionen
dc.subject.otherEarly Diagnosisen
dc.subject.otherEmergenciesen
dc.subject.otherEmergency Service, Hospital.organization & administrationen
dc.subject.otherFemaleen
dc.subject.otherHospital Mortalityen
dc.subject.otherHospital Rapid Response Team.organization & administrationen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherMaleen
dc.subject.otherNeeds Assessmenten
dc.subject.otherPatient Safetyen
dc.subject.otherReference Standardsen
dc.subject.otherRisk Assessmenten
dc.subject.otherTreatment Outcomeen
dc.subject.otherTriageen
dc.titleEmergency department rapid response systems: the case for a standardized approach to deteriorating patients.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleEuropean journal of emergency medicine : official journal of the European Society for Emergency Medicineen
dc.identifier.affiliationaDeakin University-Northern Health Clinical Partnership, Burwood bDepartment of Intensive Care, Austin Health, Heidelberg cAustralian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre, Monash University, Prahran, Victoria, Australiaen
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/MEJ.0b013e32835d1e14en
dc.description.pages375-81en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23325146en
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
crisitem.author.deptIntensive Care-
crisitem.author.deptIntensive Care-
crisitem.author.deptData Analytics Research and Evaluation (DARE) Centre-
Appears in Collections:Journal articles
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