Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11164
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dc.contributor.authorHamilton, E Jen
dc.contributor.authorGianatti, Emily Jen
dc.contributor.authorStrauss, B Jen
dc.contributor.authorWentworth, Jen
dc.contributor.authorLim-Joon, Den
dc.contributor.authorBolton, Damien Men
dc.contributor.authorZajac, J Den
dc.contributor.authorGrossmann, Mathisen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-16T00:45:06Z
dc.date.available2015-05-16T00:45:06Z
dc.date.issued2011-03-01en
dc.identifier.citationClinical Endocrinology; 74(3): 377-83en
dc.identifier.govdoc21118287en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttps://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11164en
dc.description.abstractAndrogen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer is associated with increases in fat mass and risk of type 2 diabetes; however, the relationship between sex steroid deficiency and abdominal fat distribution remains controversial.We conducted a 12-month prospective observational study at a tertiary referral centre.We investigated changes in abdominal fat distribution and insulin resistance in 26 men (70.6±6.8 years) with nonmetastatic prostate cancer during the first year of ADT.Twelve months of ADT increased visceral abdominal fat area by 22% (from 160.8±61.7 to 195.9±69.7 cm(2) ; P<0.01) and subcutaneous abdominal fat area by 13% (from 240.7±107.5 to 271.3±92.8 cm(2) ; P<0.01). Fat mass increased by 14% (+3.4 kg; P<0.001) and lean tissue mass decreased by 3.6% (-1·9 kg; P<0.001). Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) increased by 12% (2.50±1.12 to 2.79±1.31, P<0.05). There was no change in fasting glucose or glycated haemoglobin levels. Total testosterone (TT) was inversely associated with visceral fat area independent of oestradiol (E2), but E2 was not associated with visceral fat area independent of TT. Visceral fat area, not TT or E2, was independently associated with insulin resistance.ADT for prostate cancer results in accumulation of both visceral and subcutaneous abdominal fat. Increased visceral fat area appears more closely linked to testosterone than oestradiol deficiency. Increased insulin resistance may arise secondary to visceral fat accumulation, rather than as a direct result of sex steroid deficiency.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAnalysis of Varianceen
dc.subject.otherAndrogen Antagonists.adverse effects.therapeutic useen
dc.subject.otherEstradiol.blooden
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherImmunoassay.methodsen
dc.subject.otherInsulin Resistanceen
dc.subject.otherIntra-Abdominal Fat.drug effects.metabolismen
dc.subject.otherLinear Modelsen
dc.subject.otherMaleen
dc.subject.otherProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.otherProstatic Neoplasms.blood.drug therapy.metabolismen
dc.subject.otherRisk Assessmenten
dc.subject.otherRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.otherSubcutaneous Fat, Abdominal.drug effects.metabolismen
dc.subject.otherTestosterone.blooden
dc.subject.otherTime Factorsen
dc.titleIncrease in visceral and subcutaneous abdominal fat in men with prostate cancer treated with androgen deprivation therapy.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleClinical Endocrinologyen
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Medicine, Austin Health/Northern Health, University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australiaen
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2265.2010.03942.xen
dc.description.pages377-83en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21118287en
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
local.name.researcherBolton, Damien M
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
crisitem.author.deptUrology-
crisitem.author.deptEndocrinology-
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