Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10717
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dc.contributor.authorBrodtmann, Amyen
dc.contributor.authorPuce, Ainaen
dc.contributor.authorDarby, David Gen
dc.contributor.authorDonnan, Geoffrey Aen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-16T00:15:26Z
dc.date.available2015-05-16T00:15:26Z
dc.date.issued2008-11-24en
dc.identifier.citationNeurorehabilitation and Neural Repair 2008; 23(2): 150-9en
dc.identifier.govdoc19029284en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10717en
dc.description.abstractVisual cortical reorganization following injury remains poorly understood. The authors performed serial functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on patients with visual cortex infarction to evaluate early and late striate, ventral, and dorsal extrastriate cortical activation.Patients were studied with fMRI within 10 days and at 6 months. The authors used a high-level visual activation task designed to activate the ventral extrastriate cortex. These data were compared to those of age-appropriate healthy control participants.The results from 24 healthy control individuals (mean age 65.7 +/- SE 3.6 years, range 32-89) were compared to those from 5 stroke patients (mean age 73.8 +/- SE 7 years, range 49-86). Patients had infarcts involving the striate and ventral extrastriate cortex. Patient activation patterns were markedly different to controls. Bilateral striate and ventral extrastriate activation was reduced at both sessions, but dorsal extrastriate activated voxel counts remained comparable to controls. Conversely, mean percent magnetic resonance signal change increased in dorsal sites.These data provide strong evidence of bilateral poststroke functional depression of striate and ventral extrastriate cortices. Possible utilization or surrogacy of the dorsal visual system was demonstrated following stroke. This activity could provide a target for novel visual rehabilitation therapies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAdulten
dc.subject.otherAgeden
dc.subject.otherAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.otherBrain Mappingen
dc.subject.otherDisability Evaluationen
dc.subject.otherFunctional Laterality.physiologyen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherImage Processing, Computer-Assisted.methodsen
dc.subject.otherMagnetic Resonance Imagingen
dc.subject.otherMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.otherNeuronal Plasticity.physiologyen
dc.subject.otherNeuropsychological Testsen
dc.subject.otherPhotic Stimulationen
dc.subject.otherPredictive Value of Testsen
dc.subject.otherRecovery of Function.physiologyen
dc.subject.otherStroke.pathology.physiopathologyen
dc.subject.otherVision Disorders.etiology.pathology.physiopathologyen
dc.subject.otherVisual Cortex.blood supply.pathology.physiopathologyen
dc.subject.otherVisual Pathways.pathology.physiopathologyen
dc.titleSerial functional imaging poststroke reveals visual cortex reorganization.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleNeurorehabilitation and neural repairen
dc.identifier.affiliationNational Stroke Research Institute, Austin Health, University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Melbourne, Australiaen
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1545968308321774en
dc.description.pages150-9en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19029284en
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
crisitem.author.deptThe Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health-
crisitem.author.deptThe Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health-
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