Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10278
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dc.contributor.authorSveller, Cen
dc.contributor.authorBriellmann, Regula Sen
dc.contributor.authorSaling, Michael Men
dc.contributor.authorLillywhite, Len
dc.contributor.authorAbbott, David Fen
dc.contributor.authorMasterton, Richard A Jen
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Graeme Den
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-15T23:41:01Z
dc.date.available2015-05-15T23:41:01Z
dc.date.issued2006-11-28en
dc.identifier.citationNeurology; 67(10): 1813-7en
dc.identifier.govdoc17130414en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttps://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10278en
dc.description.abstractTo investigate the relationship between language lateralization and handedness in patients with epilepsy and a left-sided seizure focus and in healthy control subjects.We recruited a consecutive series of 74 patients and 70 control subjects. Functional MRI, using a noun-verb generation task, was performed to establish the language laterality index (LI). Handedness was quantified using the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory.Patients showed a shift toward atypical language lateralization (0.43 +/- 0.47; controls 0.57 +/- 034; p < or = 0.05) and left-handedness (55 +/- 57; controls 74 +/- 39; p < or = 0.05). The LI and handedness were correlated in patients (r = 0.54; F = 25.9; p < 0.001) but not in control subjects (r = 0.1; F = 0.64; NS). A combination of left-handedness and atypical LI was more frequent in patients (12%) than control subjects (0%; p < or = 0.05). Crossed hemispheric specialization (e.g., right-handedness associated with atypical LI) was equally frequent in patients (20%) and control subjects (16%; NS).In epilepsy patients with a left-sided seizure focus, language lateralization is correlated to handedness. The increased frequency of left-handedness and associated atypical language lateralization is most likely related to the left-hemispheric seizure focus, influencing hemispheric specialization for both domains.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAdolescenten
dc.subject.otherAdulten
dc.subject.otherBrain Mappingen
dc.subject.otherCerebral Cortex.pathology.physiopathology.radionuclide imagingen
dc.subject.otherCorpus Callosum.physiologyen
dc.subject.otherElectroencephalographyen
dc.subject.otherEpilepsies, Partial.diagnosis.physiopathologyen
dc.subject.otherFemaleen
dc.subject.otherFunctional Laterality.physiologyen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherLanguageen
dc.subject.otherLanguage Testsen
dc.subject.otherMagnetic Resonance Imagingen
dc.subject.otherMaleen
dc.subject.otherMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.otherNeural Pathways.pathology.physiopathology.radionuclide imagingen
dc.subject.otherPositron-Emission Tomographyen
dc.subject.otherTomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photonen
dc.subject.otherVerbal Behavior.physiologyen
dc.titleRelationship between language lateralization and handedness in left-hemispheric partial epilepsy.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleNeurologyen
dc.identifier.affiliationBrain Research Institute, Neurosciences Bldg., Austin Health, Heidelberg West, Victoria, 3081, Australiaen
dc.identifier.doi10.1212/01.wnl.0000244465.74707.42en
dc.description.pages1813-7en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17130414en
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
local.name.researcherAbbott, David F
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.grantfulltextnone-
crisitem.author.deptClinical Neuropsychology-
crisitem.author.deptThe Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health-
crisitem.author.deptThe Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health-
crisitem.author.deptNeurology-
crisitem.author.deptThe Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health-
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