Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/26746
Title: The sourcing and use of high physical resemblance personal protective equipment to train healthcare workers, improve confidence and conserve medical-grade equipment.
Austin Authors: Bumpstead, S;Lim, Z J;Kuhn, L;Flynn, D;Bakos, C-L;Potter, E;Egerton-Warburton, D
Affiliation: Monash Emergency Research Collaborative, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Monash Medical Centre Clayton, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Anaesthesia
School of Clinical Sciences at Monash Health, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Emergency Medicine Research, Monash Medical Centre, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Design Health Collab, Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture, Monash University, Caulfield, Victoria, Australia
Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, Monash Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University and Monash Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture, Monash University, Caulfield, Victoria, Australia
MCI Australia Ltd, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: Jun-2021
Date: 2021-04-14
Publication information: The Journal of Hospital Infection 2021; 112: 104-107
Abstract: Personal protective equipment (PPE) is essential for healthcare worker (HCW) safety. Conservation of PPE for clinical use during the COVID-19 pandemic reduced its availability for training, necessitating an innovative approach to sourcing high physical resemblance PPE (HPR-PPE). We present a case study of crowd-sourcing of HPR-PPE to train HCWs. Survey results indicated that HPR-PPE enabled high-fidelity practise of PPE application and removal, aided procedure recall, improved user confidence and was sufficiently similar to medical-grade PPE. HPR-PPE provided a novel and cost-effective alternative. We also demonstrated that medical-grade PPE can be sourced from non-medical institutions and businesses during a pandemic.
URI: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/26746
DOI: 10.1016/j.jhin.2021.04.003
Journal: The Journal of Hospital Infection
PubMed URL: 33864893
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: COVID-19
Healthcare worker
Infection transmission
Occupational safety
Personal protective equipment (PPE)
Simulation training
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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