Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/23759
Title: Relapse Patterns in NMOSD: Evidence for Earlier Occurrence of Optic Neuritis and Possible Seasonal Variation.
Austin Authors: Khalilidehkordi, Elham;Clarke, Laura;Arnett, Simon;Bukhari, Wajih;Jimenez Sanchez, Sofia;O'Gorman, Cullen;Sun, Jing;Prain, Kerri M;Woodhall, Mark;Silvestrini, Roger;Bundell, Christine S;Abernethy, David;Bhuta, Sandeep;Blum, Stefan;Boggild, Mike;Boundy, Karyn;Brew, Bruce J;Brown, Matthew;Brownlee, Wallace;Butzkueven, Helmut;Carroll, William M;Chen, Celia;Coulthard, Alan;Dale, Russell C;Das, Chandi;Fabis-Pedrini, Marzena J;Fulcher, David;Gillis, David;Hawke, Simon;Heard, Robert;Henderson, Andrew P D;Heshmat, Saman;Hodgkinson, Suzanne;Kilpatrick, Trevor J;King, John;Kneebone, Chris;Kornberg, Andrew J;Lechner-Scott, Jeannette;Lin, Ming-Wei;Lynch, Christopher;Macdonell, Richard A L ;Mason, Deborah F;McCombe, Pamela A;Pereira, Jennifer;Pollard, John D;Ramanathan, Sudarshini;Reddel, Stephen W;Shaw, Cameron;Spies, Judith;Stankovich, James;Sutton, Ian;Vucic, Steve;Walsh, Michael;Wong, Richard C;Yiu, Eppie M;Barnett, Michael H;Kermode, Allan G;Marriott, Mark P;Parratt, John;Slee, Mark;Taylor, Bruce V;Willoughby, Ernest;Brilot, Fabienne;Vincent, Angela;Waters, Patrick;Broadley, Simon A
Affiliation: Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia
Department of Neurology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia
Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia
Centre for Clinical Research, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia
Department of Neurology, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia
School of Medicine, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, VIC, Australia
Department of Neurology, St Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia
Westmead Clinical School, Westmead Hospital, University of Sydney, Westmead, NSW, Australia
Department of Neurology, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Division of Immunology, HSQ Pathology Queensland Central Laboratory, Herston, QLD, Australia
School of Paediatrics, Royal Children's Hospital, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia
Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia
Centre for Neuromuscular and Neurological Disorders, Perron Institute for Neurological and Translational Science, Queen Elizabeth II Medical Centre, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia
Department of Neurology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, QLD, Australia
Department of Immunopathology, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia
School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, Australia
Department of Neurology, Townsville University Hospital, Douglas, QLD, Australia
Peter Duncan Neurosciences Unit, Centre for Applied Medical Research and Department of Neurology, St Vincent's Hospital, University of New South Wales, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia
Institute of Health Biomedical Innovation, Translational Research Institute, Queensland University of Technology, Woolloongabba, QLD, Australia
Department of Neuroscience, Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
School of Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia
Department of Neurology, Canberra Hospital, Garran, ACT, Australia
South Western Sydney Medical School, Liverpool Hospital, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, NSW, Australia
Department of Neurology, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, VIC, Australia
Sydney Medical School, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia
Flinders Medical Centre, Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA, Australia
Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia
Brain Autoimmunity Group, Institute for Neuroscience and Muscle Research, The Kids Research Institute at the Children's Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia
Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, Southport, QLD, Australia
Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, John Radcliffe Infirmary, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
Department of Neurology, Wellington Hospital, Newtown, United Kingdom
Department of Neurology, Auckland City Hospital, Grafton, New Zealand
School of Medicine, University of Auckland, Grafton, New Zealand
Department of Neurology, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand
School of Medicine, University of Auckland, Grafton, New Zealand
Department of Neurology, Auckland City Hospital, Grafton, New Zealand
Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, John Radcliffe Infirmary, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
Issue Date: 2020
metadata.dc.date: 2020
Publication information: Frontiers in neurology 2020; 11: 537
Abstract: Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) and multiple sclerosis (MS) show overlap in their clinical features. We performed an analysis of relapses with the aim of determining differences between the two conditions. Cases of NMOSD and age- and sex-matched MS controls were collected from across Australia and New Zealand. Demographic and clinical information, including relapse histories, were recorded using a standard questionnaire. There were 75 cases of NMOSD and 101 MS controls. There were 328 relapses in the NMOSD cases and 375 in MS controls. Spinal cord and optic neuritis attacks were the most common relapses in both NMOSD and MS. Optic neuritis (p < 0.001) and area postrema relapses (P = 0.002) were more common in NMOSD and other brainstem attacks were more common in MS (p < 0.001). Prior to age 30 years, attacks of optic neuritis were more common in NMOSD than transverse myelitis. After 30 this pattern was reversed. Relapses in NMOSD were more likely to be treated with acute immunotherapies and were less likely to recover completely. Analysis by month of relapse in NMOSD showed a trend toward reduced risk of relapse in February to April compared to a peak in November to January (P = 0.065). Optic neuritis and transverse myelitis are the most common types of relapse in NMOSD and MS. Optic neuritis tends to occur more frequently in NMOSD prior to the age of 30, with transverse myelitis being more common thereafter. Relapses in NMOSD were more severe. A seasonal bias for relapses in spring-summer may exist in NMOSD.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/23759
DOI: 10.3389/fneur.2020.00537
PubMed URL: 32612571
ISSN: 1664-2295
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: aquaporin
epidemiology
multiple sclerosis
neuromyelitis optica
relapse
seasonality
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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