Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/20221
Title: Infectious Disease Transmission in Solid Organ Transplantation: Donor Evaluation, Recipient Risk, and Outcomes of Transmission.
Austin Authors: White, Sarah L;Rawlinson, William;Boan, Peter;Sheppeard, Vicky;Wong, Germaine;Waller, Karen;Opdam, Helen I ;Kaldor, John;Fink, Michael;Verran, Deborah;Webster, Angela;Wyburn, Kate;Grayson, Lindsay;Glanville, Allan;Cross, Nick;Irish, Ashley;Coates, Toby;Griffin, Anthony;Snell, Greg;Alexander, Stephen I;Campbell, Scott;Chadban, Steven;Macdonald, Peter;Manley, Paul;Mehakovic, Eva;Ramachandran, Vidya;Mitchell, Alicia;Ison, Michael
Affiliation: Women's and Children's Health and Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales Schools of Medicine, Sydney, Australia
Communicable Diseases Network Australia, New South Wales Health, Sydney, Australia
Departments of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Perth, Australia
PathWest Laboratory Medicine, Perth, Australia
Lung Transplant, Alfred Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Serology and Virology Division, NSW Health Pathology Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia
Kidney Disorders, Auckland District Health Board, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand
Department of Nephrology, Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand
Department of Thoracic Medicine and Lung Transplantation, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, Australia
Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia
School of Medical and Molecular Biosciences, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
The Organ and Tissue Authority, Australian Government, Canberra, Australia
Department of Cardiology, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, Australia
St Vincent's Hospital Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
Central Clinical School, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
Renal Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia
Department of Renal Medicine, University of Queensland at Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland, Australia
Centre for Kidney Research, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, Australia
Renal Transplantation, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland, Australia
Renal and Transplantation, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, Australia
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia
Department of Nephrology, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Perth, Australia
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, UWA Medical School, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia
Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Surgery, Melbourne Medical School, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
Centre for Transplant and Renal Research, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia
Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
Transplantation Services, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia
Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
Divisions of Infectious Diseases and Organ Transplantation, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL..
Issue Date: Jan-2019
metadata.dc.date: 2018-12-20
Publication information: Transplantation direct 2019; 5(1): e416
Abstract: In 2016, the Transplantation Society of Australia and New Zealand, with the support of the Australian Government Organ and Tissue authority, commissioned a literature review on the topic of infectious disease transmission from deceased donors to recipients of solid organ transplants. The purpose of this review was to synthesize evidence on transmission risks, diagnostic test characteristics, and recipient management to inform best-practice clinical guidelines. The final review, presented as a special supplement in Transplantation Direct, collates case reports of transmission events and other peer-reviewed literature, and summarizes current (as of June 2017) international guidelines on donor screening and recipient management. Of particular interest at the time of writing was how to maximize utilization of donors at increased risk for transmission of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, and hepatitis B virus, given the recent developments, including the availability of direct-acting antivirals for hepatitis C virus and improvements in donor screening technologies. The review also covers emerging risks associated with recent epidemics (eg, Zika virus) and the risk of transmission of nonendemic pathogens related to donor travel history or country of origin. Lastly, the implications for recipient consent of expanded utilization of donors at increased risk of blood-borne viral disease transmission are considered.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/20221
DOI: 10.1097/TXD.0000000000000852
PubMed URL: 30656214
ISSN: 2373-8731
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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