Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19160
Title: Additional weekend therapy may reduce length of rehabilitation stay after stroke: a meta-analysis of individual patient data.
Austin Authors: English, Coralie;Shields, Nora;Brusco, Natasha K;Taylor, Nicholas F;Watts, Jennifer J;Peiris, Casey;Bernhardt, Julie;Crotty, Maria;Esterman, Adrian;Segal, Leonie;Hillier, Susan
Affiliation: School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle
Health Economics and Social Policy, Health Economics and Social Policy Group, Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia
Australian Institute of Health and Tropical Medicine, James Cook University, Cairns
Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide
International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, Sansom Institute of Health Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide
University of Newcastle Priority Research Centre for Stroke and Brain Injury, Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle
Northern Health
Physiotherapy Services, Cabrini Health
Allied Health Clinical Research Office, Eastern Health, Box Hill
Centre for Population Health Research, Deakin Health Economics, Deakin University
School of Allied Health, La Trobe University
Stroke Division, The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Rehabilitation and Aged Care, Flinders University, Bedford Park Campus
International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, Sansom Institute of Health Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide
Issue Date: Jul-2016
metadata.dc.date: 2016-06-16
Publication information: Journal of physiotherapy 2016; 62(3): 124-9
Abstract: Among people receiving inpatient rehabilitation after stroke, does additional weekend physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy reduce the length of rehabilitation hospital stay compared to those who receive a weekday-only service, and does this change after controlling for individual factors? Does additional weekend therapy improve the ability to walk and perform activities of daily living, measured at discharge? Does additional weekend therapy improve health-related quality of life, measured 6 months after discharge from rehabilitation? Which individual, clinical and hospital characteristics are associated with shorter length of rehabilitation hospital stay? This study pooled individual data from two randomised, controlled trials (n=350) using an individual patient data meta-analysis and multivariate regression. People with stroke admitted to inpatient rehabilitation facilities. Additional weekend therapy (physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy) compared to usual care (5 days/week therapy). Length of rehabilitation hospital stay, independence in activities of daily living measured with the Functional Independence Measure, walking speed and health-related quality of life. Participants who received weekend therapy had a shorter length of rehabilitation hospital stay. In the un-adjusted analysis, this was not statistically significant (MD -5.7 days, 95% CI -13.0 to 1.5). Controlling for hospital site, age, walking speed and Functional Independence Measure score on admission, receiving weekend therapy was significantly associated with a shorter length of rehabilitation hospital stay (β=7.5, 95% CI 1.7 to 13.4, p=0.001). There were no significant between-group differences in Functional Independence Measure scores (MD 1.9 points, 95% CI -2.8 to 6.6), walking speed (MD 0.06 m/second, 95% CI -0.15 to 0.04) or health-related quality of life (SMD -0.04, 95% CI -0.26 to 0.19) at discharge. Modest evidence indicates that additional weekend therapy might reduce rehabilitation hospital length of stay. ACTRN12610000096055, ACTRN12609000973213. [English C, Shields N, Brusco NK, Taylor NF, Watts JJ, Peiris C, et al. (2016) Additional weekend therapy may reduce length of rehabilitation stay after stroke: a meta-analysis of individual patient data.Journal of Physiotherapy62: 124-129].
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19160
DOI: 10.1016/j.jphys.2016.05.015
ORCID: 0000-0003-2543-8722
PubMed URL: 27320831
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Occupational therapy
Physical therapy
Rehabilitation
Stroke
Weekend therapy
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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