Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16502
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dc.contributor.authorMartin, Paul R-
dc.contributor.authorAiello, Rachele-
dc.contributor.authorGilson, Kathryn-
dc.contributor.authorMeadows, Graham-
dc.contributor.authorMilgrom, Jeannette-
dc.contributor.authorReece, John-
dc.date2015-07-21-
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-12T00:56:09Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-12T00:56:09Z-
dc.date.issued2015-10-
dc.identifier.citationBehaviour Research and Therapy 2015; 73: 8-18en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/16502-
dc.description.abstractNumerous studies have demonstrated comorbidity between migraine and tension-type headache on the one hand, and depression on the other. Presence of depression is a negative prognostic indicator for behavioral treatment of headaches. Despite the recognised comorbidity, there is a limited research literature evaluating interventions designed for comorbid headaches and depression. Sixty six participants (49 female, 17 male) suffering from migraine and/or tension-type headache and major depressive disorder were randomly allocated to a Routine Primary Care control group or a Cognitive Behavior Therapy group that also received routine primary care. The treatment program involved 12 weekly 50-min sessions administered by clinical psychologists. Participants in the treatment group improved significantly more than participants in the control group from pre-to post-treatment on measures of headaches, depression, anxiety, and quality of life. Improvements achieved with treatment were maintained at four month follow-up. Comorbid anxiety disorders were not a predictor of response to treatment, and the only significant predictor was gender (men improved more than women). The new integrated treatment program appears promising and worthy of further investigation.en_US
dc.subjectCognitive behavior therapyen_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectMigraineen_US
dc.subjectTension-type headacheen_US
dc.titleCognitive behavior therapy for comorbid migraine and/or tension-type headache and major depressive disorder: an exploratory randomized controlled trialen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.journaltitleBehaviour Research and Therapyen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationSchool of Applied Psychology and Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Mt Gravatt, Queensland, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationSchool of Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, Monash Medical Centre, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationMelbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationHeidelberg Repatriation Hospital, Austin Health, Heidelberg West, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationSchool of Health Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.affiliationAustralian College of Applied Psychology, Australiaen_US
dc.identifier.pubmedurihttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26226090en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.brat.2015.07.005en_US
dc.type.contentTexten_US
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-4082-4595-
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen_US
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
crisitem.author.deptParent-Infant Research Institute-
crisitem.author.deptClinical and Health Psychology-
Appears in Collections:Journal articles
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