Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12617
Title: Collateral damage from oral ciprofloxacin versus nitrofurantoin in outpatients with urinary tract infections: a culture-free analysis of gut microbiota.
Austin Authors: Stewardson, Andrew J;Gaïa, N;François, P;Malhotra-Kumar, S;Delémont, C;Martinez de Tejada, B;Schrenzel, J;Harbarth, S;Lazarevic, V
Institutional Author: SATURN WP1 and WP3 Study Groups
Affiliation: Infection Control Program, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland
Department of Medicine (Austin Health), University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Australia
Vaccine & Infectious Disease Institute, Universiteit Antwerpen, Antwerp, Belgium.
Department of Medical Microbiology, Universiteit Antwerpen, Antwerp, Belgium
Service of Infectious Diseases, Genomic Research Laboratory, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.
Department of Primary Care, Community and Emergency Medicine, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.
Infection Control Program, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.
Issue Date: 25-Nov-2014
Publication information: Clinical Microbiology and Infection : the Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases 2014; 21(4): 344.e1-11
Abstract: Recent treatment guidelines for uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) discourage fluoroquinolone prescription because of collateral damage to commensal microbiota, but the ecologic impact of alternative agents has not been evaluated by culture-free techniques. We prospectively collected faecal samples at three time points from ambulatory patients with UTIs treated with ciprofloxacin or nitrofurantoin, patients not requiring antibiotics and household contacts of ciprofloxacin-treated patients. We described changes in gut microbiota using a culture-independent approach based on pyrosequencing of the V3-V4 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. All groups were similar at baseline. Ciprofloxacin had a significant global impact on the gut microbiota whereas nitrofurantoin did not. The end of ciprofloxacin treatment correlated with a reduced proportion of Bifidobacterium (Actinobacteria), Alistipes (Bacteroidetes) and four genera from the phylum Firmicutes (Faecalibacterium, Oscillospira, Ruminococcus and Dialister) and an increased relative abundance of Bacteroides (Bacteroidetes) and the Firmicutes genera Blautia, Eubacterium and Roseburia. Substantial recovery had occurred 4 weeks later. Nitrofurantoin treatment correlated with a reduced relative proportion of the genus Clostridium and an increased proportion of the genus Faecalibacterium. This study supports use of nitrofurantoin over fluoroquinolones for treatment of uncomplicated UTIs to minimize perturbation of intestinal microbiota.
Gov't Doc #: 25658522
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12617
DOI: 10.1016/j.cmi.2014.11.016
URL: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25658522
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Antibiotics
ecologic damage
microbiomics
microbiota
urinary tract infection
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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