Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12351
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dc.contributor.authorChin, Ruthen
dc.contributor.authorTorresi, Josephen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-16T02:02:23Z
dc.date.available2015-05-16T02:02:23Z
dc.date.issued2013-11-19en
dc.identifier.citationInfectious Diseases and Therapy 2013; 2(2): 145-58en
dc.identifier.govdoc25134477en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12351en
dc.description.abstractThe Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is endemic in many countries in southern Asia and the western Pacific Rim, with new spread to previously unrecognized countries. It is an important cause of childhood neurological disease associated with permanent neurological sequelae and death. Fortunately, JE is a vaccine-preventable disease. The ChimeriVax™-JE (Sanofi Pasteur, Lyon, France) is a live-attenuated chimeric vaccine derived from the live-attenuated yellow fever virus, YF17D, which expresses the envelope proteins of the attenuated JEV vaccine strain, SA14-14-2. It is a safe, well-tolerated vaccine that is highly immunogenic in adults and children. The average geometric mean neutralizing antibody titer (GMT) in adults is 1,392 and over 90% of adults remain seroprotected 5 years after vaccination. In children and toddlers, more than 80% remain seroprotected 2 years after primary vaccination and demonstrate a robust and durable anamnestic response (>500-fold rise in GMT) with 99.1% seroprotection rates 1 year after a booster vaccine dose. The ChimeriVax™-JE is effective in children living in endemic regions where the vaccine could possibly be integrated into existing childhood vaccination programs. ChimeriVax™-JE is also indicated for travelers at risk of JE infection.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleJapanese B Encephalitis: An Overview of the Disease and Use of Chimerivax-JE as a Preventative Vaccine.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleInfectious diseases and therapyen
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Medicine, Austin Hospital, University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, 3084, Australiaen
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s40121-013-0018-2en
dc.description.pages145-58en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25134477en
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
crisitem.author.deptInfectious Diseases-
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