Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11897
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dc.contributor.authorMilgrom, Jeannette-
dc.contributor.authorGemmill, Alan W-
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-16T01:31:45Z
dc.date.available2015-05-16T01:31:45Z
dc.date.issued2013-09-02-
dc.identifier.citationBest Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology 2013; 28(1): 13-23en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11897en
dc.description.abstractPerinatal depression is prevalent, under-diagnosed and can have serious long-term effects on the wellbeing of women, their partners and infants. In the absence of active identification strategies, most women with perinatal depression will neither seek nor receive help. To enable early detection and timely intervention, universal screening is coming to be seen as best practice in many settings. Although the strength of recommendations and the preferred methods of identification vary in different countries (e.g. the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, brief case-finding questions), appropriate training for health professionals in wider psychosocial assessment is essential to maximise usefulness while minimising potential harms. Clear pathways of systematic follow up of all positive screening results with a diagnostic procedure and access to effective treatment are centrally important both for the clinical effectiveness of screening and for health system costs. It is also necessary to further build on the emerging evidence base for the clinical effectiveness of screening.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherEdinburgh Postnatal Depression Scaleen
dc.subject.otherantenatalen
dc.subject.otherdepressionen
dc.subject.othereffectivenessen
dc.subject.otherperinatalen
dc.subject.otherpostnatalen
dc.subject.otherscreeningen
dc.subject.otherDepression.diagnosisen
dc.subject.otherDepression, Postpartum.diagnosisen
dc.subject.otherFemaleen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherMass Screeningen
dc.subject.otherMothers.psychologyen
dc.subject.otherPatient Acceptance of Health Careen
dc.subject.otherPeripartum Period.psychologyen
dc.subject.otherPregnancyen
dc.subject.otherPsychiatric Status Rating Scalesen
dc.subject.otherPsychological Testsen
dc.titleScreening for perinatal depression.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleBest practice & research. Clinical obstetrics & gynaecologyen
dc.identifier.affiliationParent-Infant Research Instituteen
dc.identifier.affiliationMelbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australiaen
dc.identifier.affiliationClinical and Health Psychologyen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bpobgyn.2013.08.014en
dc.description.pages13-23en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24095728en
dc.type.contentTexten
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-4082-4595en
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
crisitem.author.deptParent-Infant Research Institute-
crisitem.author.deptClinical and Health Psychology-
crisitem.author.deptParent-Infant Research Institute-
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