Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11779
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dc.contributor.authorIuliano, Sen
dc.contributor.authorOlden, Aen
dc.contributor.authorWoods, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-16T01:24:25Z
dc.date.available2015-05-16T01:24:25Z
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging; 17(6): 503-8en
dc.identifier.govdoc23732545en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11779en
dc.description.abstract[corrected] Institutionalized elderly are at high risk of malnutrition, including those residing in low-level aged-care and able to self-feed. We used comprehensive dietary intake assessments to determine the nutritional adequacy of food served to residents and if food waste contributed to insufficient nutrient intakes.Cross sectional.18 low-level aged care facilities.199 residents (mean age 86.7 yrs, 76% females).Dietary data using 3-6 day weighed food records. Foods were categorized into main food groups (grains, fruit, vegetables, meats, dairy and 'extra') and quantified based on recommended serving sizes. Chi squared test was used to determine sex differences in proportion of residents below recommended intake levels.Residents were provided with sufficient serves of fruit (>2) and meats (>1), but not dairy (<3), vegetables (<5) and grain foods (women only, <4), and excess serves of 'extra' foods (>2). Mean dietary intakes did not meet recommendations for calcium, zinc, magnesium, potassium, folate and dietary fibre with many residents not meeting energy and protein requirements. Sodium intake was up to 3 times higher than recommended, and sugars consumed in excess. Food waste was 0-15% and resulted in men not consuming recommended serves of grain foods. 'Extra' foods contributed substantially to energy intake but provided few of the required nutrients.Substituting some 'extra' foods for serves of dairy, vegetables and wholegrain foods would improve the nutritional quality of foods, without altering food volume, so is feasible to improve nutritional status in elderly aged-care residents.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.otherCerealsen
dc.subject.otherCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.otherDairy Productsen
dc.subject.otherDiet Recordsen
dc.subject.otherDietary Fiber.administration & dosageen
dc.subject.otherEnergy Intakeen
dc.subject.otherFemaleen
dc.subject.otherFood Servicesen
dc.subject.otherFruiten
dc.subject.otherHomes for the Ageden
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherMaleen
dc.subject.otherMeaten
dc.subject.otherMicronutrients.administration & dosageen
dc.subject.otherNutrition Assessmenten
dc.subject.otherNutritional Requirementsen
dc.subject.otherNutritional Statusen
dc.subject.otherNutritive Valueen
dc.subject.otherVegetablesen
dc.titleMeeting the nutritional needs of elderly residents in aged-care: are we doing enough?en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleThe journal of nutrition, health & agingen
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Endocrinology, Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, West Heidelberg, Australia, 3081.en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12603-013-0042-7en
dc.description.pages503-8en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23732545en
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
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