Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11702
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dc.contributor.authorMcCrory, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorMeeuwisse, Willem Hen
dc.contributor.authorKutcher, Jeffrey Sen
dc.contributor.authorJordan, Barry Den
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Andrewen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-16T01:19:13Z
dc.date.available2015-05-16T01:19:13Z
dc.date.issued2013-04-01en
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Sports Medicine; 47(5): 327-30en
dc.identifier.govdoc23479493en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11702en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this paper was to review the current state of evidence for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in retired athletes and to consider the potential differential diagnoses that require consideration when retired athletes present with cognitive and psychiatric problems.MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Mosby's Index, PsycEXTRA, PsycINFO and Scopus. Key words included CTE, dementia pugilistica, punch drunk syndrome, traumatic encephalopathy, CTE, repetitive head injury, sports concussion, multiple concussions, chronic concussions, subconcussive blow and sports-related traumatic brain injury.At present, there are no published epidemiological, cross-sectional or prospective studies relating to modern CTE. Owing to the nature of the published studies, being case reports or pathological case series, it is not possible to determine the causality or risk factors with any certainty. As such, the speculation that repeated concussion or subconcussive impacts cause CTE remains unproven. The extent to which age-related changes, psychiatric or mental health illness, alcohol/drug use or coexisting dementing illnesses contribute to this process is largely unaccounted for in the published literature.At present, the interpretation of causation in the modern CTE case studies should proceed cautiously. The causal assumptions require further prospective or longitudinal studies on the topic.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAge Factorsen
dc.subject.otherAthletic Injuries.etiology.pathology.psychologyen
dc.subject.otherBrain Injury, Chronic.pathology.psychologyen
dc.subject.otherCognition Disorders.etiologyen
dc.subject.otherDepressive Disorder.etiologyen
dc.subject.otherDiagnosis, Differentialen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherNeurodegenerative Diseases.etiologyen
dc.subject.otherPost-Concussion Syndrome.etiology.pathology.psychologyen
dc.subject.otherPrognosisen
dc.titleWhat is the evidence for chronic concussion-related changes in retired athletes: behavioural, pathological and clinical outcomes?en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleBritish Journal of Sports Medicineen
dc.identifier.affiliationFlorey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Heidelberg, Victoria 3084, Australiaen
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bjsports-2013-092248en
dc.description.pages327-30en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23479493en
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.languageiso639-1en-
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