Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10773
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dc.contributor.authorWang, Qingjuen
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Sulinen
dc.contributor.authorAlén, Markkuen
dc.contributor.authorSeeman, Egoen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-16T00:19:36Z
dc.date.available2015-05-16T00:19:36Z
dc.date.issued2009-02-17en
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 2009; 94(5): 1555-61en
dc.identifier.govdoc19223517en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10773en
dc.description.abstractBone must be rigid for leverage yet light for mobility. We studied how bone modeling and remodeling fashioned differences in bone size, shape, and mass during growth to achieve these properties in adulthood.We measured the structural features of a tibial cross-section using quantitative computed tomography and markers of remodeling in 258 10- to 13-yr-old girls during 2 yr and in 108 of their mothers.Tibia total cross-sectional area and mass correlated between daughters and their mothers (r = 0.34 and 0.44, respectively, both P < 0.01). The location of a daughter's tibial total cross-sectional area, medullar area, and bone mass in the lower, middle, or upper part of the sample distribution was established before puberty and tracked during 2 yr (r = 0.84-0.94 first vs. last measurements' ranking). Tibial cross-sectional area correlated with medullar area (r = 0.69). Both areas correlated inversely with volumetric bone mineral density (r = -0.32 and -0.67, respectively; all P < 0.001), so larger cross-sections had a lower volumetric bone mineral density. The amount of bone deposited on the anterior and posterior periosteal surface during 2 yr was twice that deposited medially and laterally (P < 0.001), increasing strength more in the former than in the latter principal axis.Differences in skeletal size, shape, and mass in adulthood are likely to be largely established before puberty. We infer that bone fragility in advanced age has its structural antecedents partly established in early life.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAdolescenten
dc.subject.otherAdulten
dc.subject.otherAnthropometryen
dc.subject.otherBone Densityen
dc.subject.otherBone Development.genetics.physiologyen
dc.subject.otherBone Remodeling.genetics.physiologyen
dc.subject.otherBone and Bones.anatomy & histologyen
dc.subject.otherChilden
dc.subject.otherFemaleen
dc.subject.otherFractures, Bone.epidemiologyen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.otherPuberty.physiologyen
dc.subject.otherTibia.anatomy & histology.growth & developmenten
dc.titleBone's structural diversity in adult females is established before puberty.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleThe Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolismen
dc.identifier.affiliationAustin Health, University of Melbourne, Heidelberg 3081, Melbourne, Australiaen
dc.identifier.doi10.1210/jc.2008-2339en
dc.description.pages1555-61en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19223517en
dc.contributor.corpauthorFinnish Calex Study Groupen
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
crisitem.author.deptEndocrinology-
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