Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10475
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dc.contributor.authorDavis, Ian Den
dc.contributor.authorSkak, Krestenen
dc.contributor.authorSmyth, Mark Jen
dc.contributor.authorKristjansen, Paul E Gen
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Dennis Men
dc.contributor.authorSivakumar, Pallavur Ven
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-15T23:56:01Z
dc.date.available2015-05-15T23:56:01Z
dc.date.issued2007-12-01en
dc.identifier.citationClinical Cancer Research; 13(23): 6926-32en
dc.identifier.govdoc18056166en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10475en
dc.description.abstractInterleukin-21 (IL-21) is a cytokine with structural and sequence homology to IL-2 and IL-15, yet possesses several biological properties distinct from these cytokines. IL-21 is produced mainly by activated CD4(+) T cells and natural killer T cells and mediates its activity by binding to the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R), consisting of an IL-21-specific alpha chain (IL-21Ralpha; JAK/STAT) that heterodimerizes with the common gamma chain (CD132). Intracellular signaling occurs through the Janus-activated kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathways. Physiologic expression of IL-21R is restricted to lymphoid tissues and peripheral blood mononuclear cells; however, other tissues such as epithelium, synovium, or transformed cells can acquire expression of both components of IL-21R heterodimer. IL-21 has complex activities on a wide variety of cell types, leading to enhancement of adaptive T-cell immunity, antibody production, activation of natural killer cell subtypes, and opposition to suppressive effects mediated by regulatory T cells. Functionally, these activities promote immune responses and point to a physiologic role of IL-21 in autoimmunity and immune enhancement. Therapeutic manipulation of IL-21 activity may allow improved immunotherapy for cancer as well as insights into autoimmune disease. Recently conducted phase 1 trials in metastatic melanoma and renal cell carcinoma have shown that recombinant IL-21 has a favorable safety profile and support its continued investigation as a potential anticancer drug.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAnimalsen
dc.subject.otherAutoimmunity.physiologyen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherInterleukins.immunology.metabolism.therapeutic useen
dc.subject.otherNeoplasms.immunology.metabolism.therapyen
dc.subject.otherReceptors, Interleukin-21.immunology.metabolismen
dc.subject.otherSignal Transductionen
dc.titleInterleukin-21 signaling: functions in cancer and autoimmunity.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleClinical Cancer Researchen
dc.identifier.affiliationLudwig-Austin Joint Medical Oncology Unit, Austin Health, Melbourne, Australiaen
dc.identifier.doi10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-07-1238en
dc.description.pages6926-32en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18056166en
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
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