Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10359
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dc.contributor.authorBuist, Anneen
dc.contributor.authorSpeelman, Cen
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Barbara Aen
dc.contributor.authorReay, Ren
dc.contributor.authorMilgrom, Jeannetteen
dc.contributor.authorMeyer, Den
dc.contributor.authorCondon, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-15T23:47:14Z-
dc.date.available2015-05-15T23:47:14Z-
dc.date.issued2007-03-01en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology; 28(1): 49-54en
dc.identifier.govdoc17454513en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10359en
dc.description.abstractTo assess the impact that education through participation in a depression screening program has on mental health literacy and help seeking behavior in perinatal women.Responses to a hypothetical case of depression, help seeking behavior, and screening levels for risk of depression using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale were compared between two groups of postnatal women; one group who had participated in a screening program and the other who had not. Those who participated in the screening program were also asked to evaluate the educational material they had received.A total of 1309 women, broadly representative of postnatal women, answered one or more questionnaires. Those who had participated in the screening program were better able to recognize depression in a hypothetical case, and also assess their own mental state more appropriately. Those women who had been part of the program and did not score high on the EPDS were less likely to seek help, were more satisfied when they did and tended to benefit more from the educational booklet.Participation in a screening program with educational material had significant benefits for mental health literacy and the health service use for perinatal women at risk for depression.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAdaptation, Psychologicalen
dc.subject.otherAustraliaen
dc.subject.otherDepression, Postpartum.psychologyen
dc.subject.otherEducational Statusen
dc.subject.otherFemaleen
dc.subject.otherHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherMental Healthen
dc.subject.otherMothers.psychology.statistics & numerical dataen
dc.subject.otherNeeds Assessmenten
dc.subject.otherPatient Acceptance of Health Care.psychologyen
dc.subject.otherPregnancyen
dc.subject.otherQuestionnairesen
dc.subject.otherSelf-Assessmenten
dc.titleImpact of education on women with perinatal depression.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleJournal of psychosomatic obstetrics and gynaecologyen
dc.identifier.affiliationUniversity of Melbourne, Austin Health, Victoria, Australiaen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01674820601143187en
dc.description.pages49-54en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17454513en
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-4082-4595-
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
crisitem.author.deptPsychiatry (University of Melbourne)-
crisitem.author.deptParent-Infant Research Institute-
crisitem.author.deptClinical and Health Psychology-
Appears in Collections:Journal articles
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