Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10064
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMilgrom, Jeannetteen
dc.contributor.authorNegri, Lisa Men
dc.contributor.authorGemmill, Alan Wen
dc.contributor.authorMcNeil, Margareten
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Paul Ren
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-15T23:23:59Z
dc.date.available2015-05-15T23:23:59Z
dc.date.issued2005-11-01en
dc.identifier.citationThe British Journal of Clinical Psychology / the British Psychological Society; 44(Pt 4): 529-42en
dc.identifier.govdoc16368032en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10064en
dc.description.abstractFirst, to establish the efficacy of psychological interventions versus routine primary care for the management of postnatal depression (PND). Secondly, to provide a direct comparison of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) versus counselling and, finally, to compare the relative value of group and individual delivery formats.The study involved 192 depressed women drawn from a large community screening programme in Melbourne, Australia and allocated to cognitive behaviour therapy, counselling, or routine primary care. Baseline and post-intervention measures of depression and anxiety were collected in the form of validated self-report inventories.Women were screened in the community and diagnosis of depression confirmed with a standardized psychiatric interview. Interventions were of 12 weeks duration, including three partner sessions, and adhered to a structured manual.Psychological intervention per se was superior to routine care in terms of reductions in both depression and anxiety following intervention.For those women with PND, psychological intervention is a better option than routine care, leading to clinically significant reduction of symptoms. Counselling may be as effective as group cognitive behaviour therapy. The benefits of psychological intervention may be maximized by being delivered on a one-to-one basis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAdulten
dc.subject.otherAnxiety.diagnosis.psychologyen
dc.subject.otherCognitive Therapy.methodsen
dc.subject.otherCounseling.methodsen
dc.subject.otherDepression, Postpartum.diagnosis.psychology.therapyen
dc.subject.otherFemaleen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherPregnancyen
dc.subject.otherPrimary Health Careen
dc.subject.otherPsychotherapy, Groupen
dc.subject.otherTreatment Outcomeen
dc.titleA randomized controlled trial of psychological interventions for postnatal depression.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleThe British journal of clinical psychology / the British Psychological Societyen
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Psychology, School of Behavioural Science, University of Melbourne, Australiaen
dc.identifier.doi10.1348/014466505X34200en
dc.description.pages529-42en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16368032en
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-4082-4595-
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
crisitem.author.deptParent-Infant Research Institute-
crisitem.author.deptClinical and Health Psychology-
crisitem.author.deptParent-Infant Research Institute-
Appears in Collections:Journal articles
Show simple item record

Page view(s)

16
checked on Feb 1, 2023

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.