Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10028
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dc.contributor.authorStory, David Aen
dc.contributor.authorTosolini, Aen
dc.contributor.authorBellomo, Rinaldoen
dc.contributor.authorLeblanc, Men
dc.contributor.authorBragantini, Len
dc.contributor.authorRonco, Claudioen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-15T23:21:13Z
dc.date.available2015-05-15T23:21:13Z
dc.date.issued2005-10-01en
dc.identifier.citationThe International Journal of Artificial Organs; 28(10): 961-5en
dc.identifier.govdoc16288433en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10028en
dc.description.abstractThe bicarbonate centered approach to acid-base physiology involves complex explanations for the metabolic acidosis associated with chronic renal failure. We used the alternate Stewart approach to acid-base physiology to quantify the acid-base chemistry of patients with chronic renal failure. We examined the plasma and urine chemistry of 19 patients with chronic renal failure who were predialysis and 20 healthy volunteers. We compared the plasma strong-ion-difference due to sodium,potassium,and chloride ions as well as the weak acids albumin and phosphate. We used a simplified Fencl-Stewart approach to quantify the effects of sodium-chloride, albumin, and unmeasured ions on base-excess. The chronic renal failure group had a greater metabolic acidosis, with a base-excess that differed from the healthy group by a mean of -2.7 mmol/L, p = 0.04. This was associated with a strong ion acidosis due to both increased chloride and decreased sodium. The anion gap, strong-ion-gap, and base-excess effect of unmeasured ions were similar in both groups suggesting that unmeasured ions had only a minor role in the acid-base status in this group of patients.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAcid-Base Equilibriumen
dc.subject.otherAcidosis.blood.complications.urineen
dc.subject.otherBlood Chemical Analysis.methodsen
dc.subject.otherClinical Trials as Topic.trendsen
dc.subject.otherFemaleen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherKidney.metabolismen
dc.subject.otherKidney Failure, Chronic.blood.complications.urineen
dc.subject.otherMaleen
dc.subject.otherUrinalysis.methodsen
dc.titlePlasma acid-base changes in chronic renal failure: a Stewart analysis.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleInternational Journal of Artificial Organsen
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Surgery, University of Melbourne, Austin Health, Melbourne--Australiaen
dc.description.pages961-5en
dc.relation.urlhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16288433en
dc.type.austinJournal Articleen
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
crisitem.author.deptAnaesthesia-
crisitem.author.deptIntensive Care-
crisitem.author.deptData Analytics Research and Evaluation (DARE) Centre-
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