Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/9736
Title: Genetically modified animal models as tools for studying bone and mineral metabolism.
Authors: Davey, Rachel A;MacLean, Helen E;McManus, Julie F;Findlay, David M;Zajac, Jeffrey D
Affiliation: Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia.
Issue Date: 9-Feb-2004
Citation: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society For Bone and Mineral Research 2004; 19(6): 882-92
Abstract: Genetic modification of mice is a powerful tool for the study of bone development and metabolism. This review discusses the advantages and disadvantages of various approaches used in bone-related research and the contributions these studies have made to bone biology. Genetic modification of mice is a powerful tool for the study of bone development and metabolism. This review discusses the advantages and disadvantages of various approaches used in bone-related research and the contributions these studies have made to bone biology. The approaches to genetic modification included in this review are (1) overexpression of genes, (2) global gene knockouts, (3) tissue-specific gene deletion, and (4) gene knock-in models. This review also highlights issues that should be considered when using genetically modified animal models, including the rigorous control of genetic background, use of appropriate control lines, and confirmation of tissue specificity of gene expression where appropriate. This technology provides a unique and powerful way to probe the function of genes and is already revolutionizing our approach to understanding the physiology of bone development and metabolism.
Internal ID Number: 15125787
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/9736
DOI: 10.1359/JBMR.040206
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15125787
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Animals
Animals, Genetically Modified
Bone and Bones.metabolism
Mice
Mice, Knockout
Minerals.metabolism
Models, Animal
Phenotype
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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