Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/22831
Title: Greater activation of the response inhibition network in females compared to males during stop signal task performance.
Authors: Gaillard, Alexandra;Rossell, Susan L;Carruthers, Sean P;Sumner, Philip J;Michie, Patricia T;Woods, William;Neill, Erica;Phillipou, Andrea;Lin Toh, Wei;Hughes, Matthew E
Affiliation: Centre for Mental Health, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
Functional Neuroimaging Laboratory, School of Psychology, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia
Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Department of Mental Health, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Centre for Mental Health, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Department of Psychiatry, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Issue Date: 16-Mar-2020
EDate: 2020-03-16
Citation: Behavioural brain research 2020; online first: 16 March
Abstract: Previous neuroimaging studies have reported differences in regional brain activation between males and females during stop signal task performance, suggesting the presence of sex-linked differences in brain network organization of inhibitory ability. Despite a growing literature on sex differences during stop signal task performance, a consensus still has not been reached due to variations in task design and analysis methods. Due to these disparate findings we used up to date stop signal task methods to compare behavioral performance and associated brain activation between males and females using an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging design. We observed that males were faster in inhibiting their responses, but females exhibited marked increased in stopping network activation, in addition to increased activation of the anterior insula and left amygdala. These findings suggest that males and females process stop signals differently.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/22831
DOI: 10.1016/j.bbr.2020.112586
ORCID: 0000-0003-1009-6619
PubMed URL: 32194187
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Amygdala
Cognitive control
Response inhibition
Right inferior frontal gyrus
fMRI
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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