Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/22127
Title: Grey matter volume in developmental speech and language disorder.
Authors: Pigdon, Lauren;Willmott, Catherine;Reilly, Sheena;Conti-Ramsden, Gina;Gaser, Christian;Connelly, Alan;Morgan, Angela T
Affiliation: Murdoch Children's Research Institute, 50 Flemington Rd, Parkville, VIC, 3052, Australia
Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, Monash University, 18 Innovation Walk, Clayton, VIC, 3800, Australia
Monash-Epworth Rehabilitation Research Centre, Monash University, 18 Innovation Walk, Clayton, VIC, 3800, Australia
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, 50 Flemington Rd, Parkville, VIC, 3052, Australia
Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, G40 Level 8.86, Mount Gravatt, QLD, 4222, Australia
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, 50 Flemington Rd, Parkville, VIC, 3052, Australia
The University of Manchester, Oxford Rd, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK
Jena University Hospital, Am Klinikum 1, 07747, Jena, Germany
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
University of Melbourne, Grattan Street, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, 50 Flemington Rd, Parkville, VIC, 3052, Australia
University of Melbourne, Grattan Street, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia
Royal Children's Hospital, 50 Flemington Rd, Parkville, VIC, 3052, Australia
Issue Date: Dec-2019
EDate: 2019-11-15
Citation: Brain structure & function 2019; 224(9): 3387-3398
Abstract: Developmental language disorder (DLD) and developmental speech disorder (DSD) are common, yet their etiologies are not well understood. Atypical volume of the inferior and posterior language regions and striatum have been reported in DLD; however, variability in both methodology and study findings limits interpretations. Imaging research within DSD, on the other hand, is scarce. The present study compared grey matter volume in children with DLD, DSD, and typically developing speech and language. Compared to typically developing controls, children with DLD had larger volume in the right cerebellum, possibly associated with the procedural learning deficits that have been proposed in DLD. Children with DSD showed larger volume in the left inferior occipital lobe compared to controls, which may indicate a compensatory role of the visual processing regions due to sub-optimal auditory-perceptual processes. Overall, these findings suggest that different neural systems may be involved in the specific deficits related to DLD and DSD.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/22127
DOI: 10.1007/s00429-019-01978-7
PubMed URL: 31732792
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Child
Language
MRI
Speech
VBM
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.