Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/21886
Title: Developing common demographic data elements to include in future editions of the SCAT and Child SCAT: a modified international Delphi study.
Authors: Shanks, Maxine J;McCrory, Paul R;Davis, Gavin A;Echemendia, Ruben J;Gray, Andrew R;Sullivan, S John
Affiliation: Centre for Health, Activity and Rehabilitation Research, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
Department of Neurosurgery, Cambrini Hospitals, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
University Orthopedic Center, Concussion Care Clinic, State College, Pennsylvania, USA
Centre for Biostatistics, Division of Health Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
Department of Neurosurgery, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: 11-Oct-2019
EDate: 2019-10-11
Citation: British journal of sports medicine 2019; online first: 11 October
Abstract: The Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) and Child SCAT are the 'gold standard' assessment tools for a suspected sport-related concussion (SRC). A number of 'modifiers' (eg, previous history of concussion) of a SRC have been identified. These may influence how the SCAT/Child SCAT results should be interpreted. To achieve consensus, via an international panel of SRC experts, on which athlete/player and parent/caregiver demographic variables should be considered for inclusion in future editions of the SCAT/Child SCAT respectively. A two-round modified Delphi technique, overseen by a steering committee, invited 41 panellists to achieve expert consensus (≥80% agreement). The first round utilised open questions to generate demographic variables; the second round used a five-point ordinal item to rank the importance of including each variable in future editions of the SCAT/Child SCAT. 15 experts participated in at least one Delphi round. 29 athlete/player and eight parent/caregiver variables reached consensus for inclusion in the SCAT, whereas two parent/caregiver variables reached consensus for exclusion. 28 athlete/player and four parent/caregiver variables reached consensus for the Child SCAT, whereas two parent/caregiver variables reached consensus for exclusion. Key categories of variables included the following: concussion/sport details, personal medical conditions and family medical history. This study provides a list of athlete/player and parent/caregiver demographic variables that should be considered in future revisions of the SCAT/Child SCAT. By considering (and ultimately likely including) a wider and standard set of additional demographic variables, the Concussion in Sport experts will be able to provide clinicians and researchers with data that may enhance interpretation of the individual's data and the building of larger datasets.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/21886
DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2018-100482
ORCID: 0000-0001-8293-4496
0000-0001-6116-8462
0000-0001-9407-6484
PubMed URL: 31604697
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: concussion
consensus
methodology
sporting injuries
sports and exercise medicine
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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