Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/20803
Title: Efficacy of model-based iterative reconstruction in cystic fibrosis assessment using CT.
Authors: Lin, Sandra;Lin, M;Lau, K K
Affiliation: Austin Health, 145 Studley Road, Heidelberg, Melbourne, Victoria 3084, Australia
Department of Radiology, Monash Health, 246 Clayton Road, Clayton, Melbourne, Victoria 3168, Australia
Issue Date: Jul-2019
EDate: 2019-04-26
Citation: Clinical radiology 2019; 74(7): 569.e19-569.e27
Abstract: To evaluate the efficacy of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) constructed non-enhanced ultra-low dose (ULD) computed tomography (CT) of the chest to evaluate cystic fibrosis (CF) pathology. ULD-CT was compared with chest X-ray and standard adaptive statistical iterative reconstructed (ASIR) non-enhanced low-dose CT (LD-CT). The effective radiation dose was calculated from the recorded dose-length product (DLP) values and compared between the two CT methods. Identification of pathology was compared between ULD-CT and chest X-ray. It was hypothesised that ULD-CT would be superior to chest X-ray in the identification of CF pathology at lower doses than LD-CT. The mean effective radiation dose of ULD-CT was 0.073 mSv, comparable to one chest X-ray, which was a 94% reduction compared to LD-CT. Compared to chest X-ray, ULD-CT detected on average, 2.3 more regions of bronchiectasis per study and better delineated varicose and cystic forms of bronchiectasis (p≤0.0001). ULD-CT identified four-times more mucous plugging than chest X-ray (p<0.000001) and twice the amount of consolidation (p=0.0002). ULD-CT is superior to chest X-ray in quantifying CF disease and achieves remarkable radiation doses significantly lower than LD-CT, comparable to one chest radiograph. The present results suggest that MBIR-constructed ULD-CT is an effective imaging technique for CF surveillance, with potential applications in other disease settings.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/20803
DOI: 10.1016/j.crad.2019.03.009
ORCID: 0000-0001-8959-1828
PubMed URL: 31036312
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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