Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/20729
Title: Quality of Life and 1-Year Survival in Patients With Early Septic Shock: Long-Term Follow-Up of the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation Trial.
Authors: Higgins, Alisa M;Peake, Sandra L;Bellomo, Rinaldo;Cooper, D Jamie;Delaney, Anthony;Harris, Anthony H;Howe, Belinda D;Nichol, Alistair D;Webb, Steve A;Williams, Patricia J
Affiliation: Centre for Health Economics, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Department of Intensive Care, Royal Perth Hospital and University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia
Department of Intensive Care Medicine, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia
Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Department of Intensive Care and Hyperbaric Medicine, The Alfred, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
School of Medicine and Medical Sciences, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland..
Department of Intensive Care, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Intensive Care, Royal North Shore Hospital and University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
Issue Date: 8-Apr-2019
EDate: 2019
Citation: Critical care medicine 2019; online first: 8 April
Abstract: To examine long-term survival and quality of life of patients with early septic shock. Prospective, randomized, parallel-group trial. Fifty-one hospitals in Australia, New Zealand, Finland, Hong Kong, and the Republic of Ireland. One-thousand five-hundred ninety-one patients who presented to the emergency department with early septic shock between October 2008 and April 2014, and were enrolled in the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation trial. Early goal-directed therapy versus usual care. Long-term survival was measured up to 12 months postrandomization. Health-related quality of life was measured using the EuroQoL-5D-3L, Short Form 36 and Assessment of Quality of Life 4D at baseline, and at 6 and 12 months following randomization. Mortality data were available for 1,548 patients (97.3%) and 1,515 patients (95.2%) at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Health-related quality of life data were available for 85.1% of survivors at 12 months. There were no significant differences in mortality between groups at either 6 months (early goal-directed therapy 21.8% vs usual care 22.6%; p = 0.70) or 12 months (early goal-directed therapy 26.4% vs usual care 27.9%; p = 0.50). There were no group differences in health-related quality of life at either 6 or 12 months (EuroQoL-5D-3L utility scores at 12 mo early goal-directed therapy 0.65 ± 0.33 vs usual care 0.64 ± 0.34; p = 0.50), with the health-related quality of life of both groups being significantly lower than population norms. In patients presenting to the emergency department with early septic shock, early goal-directed therapy compared with usual care did not reduce mortality nor improve health-related quality of life at either 6 or 12 months.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/20729
DOI: 10.1097/CCM.0000000000003762
ORCID: 0000-0002-1650-8939
PubMed URL: 30985391
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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