Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/20617
Title: Protecting the Continued Development of Collaborative Expert Witness Evidence in Australia: Surely We Should?
Authors: Mills, Christopher D
Affiliation: Flinders University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia
Masters of Health and Medical Law Student, University of Melbourne
West Gippsland Health Care Group
Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: Apr-2019
Citation: Journal of law and medicine 2019; 26(3): 621-637
Abstract: Australia has recognised the need to cope with changing attitudes towards advocate and expert witness immunity. While some international jurisdictions have chosen to abolish the immunity altogether, Australia has most recently, via the High Court decisions in Attwells v Jackson Lalic Lawyers Pty Ltd [2016] HCA 16 and Kendirjian v Lepore [2017] HCA 13, recognised the need for the immunity to exist, albeit with significantly narrowed scope. Generally, the principles and scope of expert witness immunity tend to follow that of advocate immunity. However, Australia is widely accepted as the most advanced judicial system supporting the use of concurrent expert evidence. This analysis discusses the unique position of Australia after these two High Court decisions that shape expert witness immunity, recognising the ongoing policy of protecting the finality of litigation. However, the legislature must be careful not to maintain this as the foremost reason for the immunity merely because the courts have chosen this pathway previously. Nor should the legislature merely maintain the status quo of expert witness immunity following advocate immunity.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/20617
PubMed URL: 30958654
ISSN: 1320-159X
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: advocate immunity
collaborative evidence
conclaves
expert immunity
hot-tubs
medical expert
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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