Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/20267
Title: The Australasian Resuscitation In Sepsis Evaluation: FLUid or vasopressors In Emergency Department Sepsis, a multicentre observational study (ARISE FLUIDS observational study): Rationale, methods and analysis plan.
Authors: Keijzers, Gerben;Macdonald, Stephen Pj;Udy, Andrew A;Arendts, Glenn;Bailey, Michael;Bellomo, Rinaldo;Blecher, Gabriel E;Burcham, Jonathon;Delaney, Anthony;Coggins, Andrew R;Fatovich, Daniel M;Fraser, John F;Harley, Amanda;Jones, Peter;Kinnear, Fran;May, Katya;Peake, Sandra;Taylor, David McD;Williams, Julian;Williams, Patricia
Affiliation: School of Medicine, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
Emergency Medicine and Trauma, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Malcolm Fisher Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Northern Clinical School, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Division of Critical Care and Trauma, The George Institute for Global Health, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Emergency Department, Monash Medical Centre, Monash Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Monash Emergency Research Collaborative, School of Clinical Sciences at Monash Health, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Intensive Care, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
School of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Medicine and Radiology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Intensive Care and Hyperbaric Medicine, The Alfred, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
School of Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
School of Medicine, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Department of Surgery, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
Adult Emergency Department, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand
Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Intensive Care Medicine, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Adelaide University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Emergency and Trauma Centre, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Department of Emergency Medicine, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Emergency Medicine, Gold Coast University Hospital, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
Emergency and Children's Services, The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Critical Care Management Team, Queensland Children's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Critical Care Research Group, The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Intensive Care Unit, St Andrew's War Memorial Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Centre for Clinical Research in Emergency Medicine, Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Emergency Department, Royal Perth Hospital, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Issue Date: 2019
EDate: 2019
Citation: Emergency medicine Australasia : EMA 2019; 31(1): 90-96
Abstract: There is uncertainty about the optimal i.v. fluid volume and timing of vasopressor commencement in the resuscitation of patients with sepsis and hypotension. We aim to study current resuscitation practices in EDs in Australia and New Zealand (the Australasian Resuscitation In Sepsis Evaluation: FLUid or vasopressors In Emergency Department Sepsis [ARISE FLUIDS] observational study). ARISE FLUIDS is a prospective, multicentre observational study in 71 hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. It will include adult patients presenting to the ED during a 30 day period with suspected sepsis and hypotension (systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg) despite at least 1000 mL fluid resuscitation. We will obtain data on baseline demographics, clinical and laboratory variables, all i.v. fluid given in the first 24 h, vasopressor use, time to antimicrobial administration, admission to intensive care, organ failure and in-hospital mortality. We will specifically describe (i) the volume of fluid administered at the following time points: when meeting eligibility criteria, in the first 6 h, at 24 h and prior to vasopressor commencement and (ii) the frequency and timing of vasopressor use in the first 6 h and at 24 h. Screening logs will provide reliable estimates of the proportion of ED patients meeting eligibility criteria for a subsequent randomised controlled trial. This multicentre, observational study will provide insight into current haemodynamic resuscitation practices in patients with sepsis and hypotension as well as estimates of practice variation and patient outcomes. The results will inform the design and feasibility of a multicentre phase III trial of early haemodynamic resuscitation in patients presenting to ED with sepsis and hypotension.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/20267
DOI: 10.1111/1742-6723.13223
ORCID: 0000-0003-1100-4552
0000-0001-9921-4620
0000-0002-6284-2022
0000-0001-7830-7756
0000-0001-8537-2011
0000-0002-5652-6920
0000-0001-9414-6905
0000-0003-1560-1186
0000-0002-8986-9997
0000-0002-1650-8939
PubMed URL: 30669181
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: emergency department
fluid therapy
hypotension
sepsis
vasopressor
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.