Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19741
Title: Mediterranean diet adherence and rate of cerebral Aβ-amyloid accumulation: Data from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Study of Ageing.
Authors: Rainey-Smith, Stephanie R;Gu, Yian;Gardener, Samantha L;Doecke, James D;Villemagne, Victor L;Brown, Belinda M;Taddei, Kevin;Laws, Simon M;Sohrabi, Hamid R;Weinborn, Michael;Ames, David;Fowler, Christopher;Macaulay, S Lance;Maruff, Paul;Masters, Colin L;Salvado, Olivier;Rowe, Christopher C;Scarmeas, Nikolaos;Martins, Ralph N
Affiliation: Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia, Australia
School of Psychological Science, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia
Academic Unit for Psychiatry of Old Age, St. Vincent's Health, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Kew, Victoria, Australia
CogState Ltd., Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia
School of Psychology and Exercise Science, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia, Australia
School of Biomedical Sciences, Macquarie University, Macquarie Park, New South Wales, Australia
Taub Institute for Research of Alzheimer's Disease and the Ageing Brain, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA
Gertrude H. Sergievsky Centre, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA
Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA
Department of Social Medicine, Psychiatry, and Neurology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
National Ageing Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Cooperative Research Centre for Mental Health, Carlton, VIC, Australia
Collaborative Genomics Group, Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer's disease Research and Care, School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia
CSIRO Health and Biosecurity/Australian e-Health Research Centre, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer's disease Research and Care, School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia
Sir James McCusker Alzheimer's Disease Research Unit (Hollywood Private Hospital), Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Issue Date: 30-Oct-2018
EDate: 2018-10-30
Citation: Translational psychiatry 2018; 8(1): 238
Abstract: Accumulating research has linked Mediterranean diet (MeDi) adherence with slower cognitive decline and reduced Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk. However, no study to-date has examined the relationship between MeDi adherence and accumulation of cerebral Aβ-amyloid (Aβ; a pathological hallmark of AD) in older adults. Cognitively normal healthy control participants of the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) Study of Ageing completed the Cancer Council of Victoria Food Frequency Questionnaire at baseline, which was used to construct a MeDi score for each participant (score range 0-9; higher score indicating higher adherence). Cerebral Aβ load was quantified by Pittsburgh Compound B positron emission tomography at baseline, 18 and 36 months: Only individuals categorised as "Aβ accumulators", and thus considered to be on the AD pathway, were included in the analysis (N = 77). The relationship between MeDi adherence, MeDi components, and change in cerebral Aβ load (baseline to 36 months) was evaluated using Generalised Linear Modelling, accounting for age, gender, education, Apolipoprotein E ε4 allele status, body mass index and total energy intake. Higher MeDi score was associated with less Aβ accumulation in our cohort (β = -0.01 ± 0.004, p = 0.0070). Of the individual MeDi score components, a high intake of fruit was associated with less accumulation of Aβ (β = -0.04 ± 0.01, p = 0.00036). Our results suggest MeDi adherence is associated with reduced cerebral AD pathology accumulation over time. When our results are considered collectively with previous data linking the MeDi to slower cognitive decline, it is apparent that MeDi adherence warrants further investigation in the quest to delay AD onset.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19741
DOI: 10.1038/s41398-018-0293-5
ORCID: 0000-0003-2863-0293
0000-0002-4355-7082
0000-0001-8017-8682
0000-0001-5069-9516
PubMed URL: 30375373
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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